Study Finds Psoriasis Drug Significantly Effective in Treating Crohn’s Disease

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ustekinumab, a human antibody used to treat arthritis, significantly induces response and remission in patients with moderate to severe Crohn’s disease. Results of the clinical trial will appear in the November 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“A high percentage of the patients in the study who had not responded to conventional therapies were in clinical remission after only a single dose of intravenous ustekinumab,” said William J. Sandborn, MD, professor of medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine and director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at UC San Diego Health. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. William Sandborn

William J. Sandborn, MD

William A. Sandborn, MD, is chief of the Division of Gastroenterology in the Department of Medicine.

Poison Drummer Rikki Rockett Cancer-Free Following Immunotherapy at UC San Diego Health

Rikki Rockett, drummer for the band Poison, got the best news of his life last week: his cancer is gone. Rockett was diagnosed with oral cancer more than a year ago. Several months ago, he came to Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, where he underwent experimental cancer immunotherapy, which has now eradicated the tumor.

Rockett says he joined the clinical trial not only out of concern about himself, but also about being around for his three-year-old daughter, Lucy, and his seven-year-old son, Jude. … Read the Full Story by Heather Buschman from the UC San Diego Newsroom

Personalized Medicine Leads to Better Outcomes for Patients with Cancer

In a meta-analysis of hundreds of clinical trials involving thousands of patients, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that therapeutic approaches using precision medicine, which emphasizes the use of individual genetics to refine cancer treatment, showed improved response and longer periods of disease remission, even in phase I trials.

The findings are published in the June 6, 2016 issue of JAMA Oncology. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Razelle Kurzrock

Dr. Razelle Kurzrock

The senior author of the report in JAMA Oncology is Razelle Kurzrock, MD, Director of the Center for Personalized Cancer Therapy and Clinical Trials Office at Moores Cancer Center.

Dr. Kurzrock is Chief of the Division of Hematology-Oncology in the Department of Medicine.

Diabetes Drug Found No Better Than Placebo at Treating NAFLD

But randomized, double-blind clinical trial suggests better way to conduct future trials —

A diabetes medication described in some studies as an effective treatment for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) works no better than a placebo, report researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, after conducting the first randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial of sitagliptin, an oral antihyperglycemic marketed by Merck & Co. under the name Januvia.

Writing in the Journal of Hepatology, a multidisciplinary team headed by study senior author Rohit Loomba, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and director of the NAFLD Translational Research Unit at UC San Diego School of Medicine … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

Study Shows Ozanimod as Effective in Treating Ulcerative Colitis

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ozanimod (RPC1063), a novel drug molecule, is moderately effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Results of the Phase II clinical trial will appear in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“This new class of immunotherapy drug traps white blood cells in the lymph nodes to prevent their escape into the gut where they cause inflammation,” said William J. Sandborn, MD … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. William Sandborn

Dr. William Sandborn

William Sandborn, MD, is Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at UC San Diego.

Read the article abstract in the New England Journal of Medicine.

UC San Diego Health Joins National Clinical Trial on Hemophilia B Gene Therapy

69-year-old hemophilia sufferer joins trial after lifetime of spontaneous bleeding —

The Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center at UC San Diego Health has joined a nationwide clinical trial testing a potential gene therapy that may one day provide a better and long-lasting treatment for people with hemophilia B.

The Phase I/II open-label trial is sponsored by Baxalta Incorporated and will assess the safety and optimal dosing level of an investigational blood clotting factor IX gene therapy treatment. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Annette Von Drygalski, MD, PharmDDirecting the Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center at UC San Diego Health is Annette Von Drygalski, MD, PharmD, Associate Clinical Professor in the Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine.

In her research, Dr. Von Drygalski is a basic, translational and clinical scientist specializing in hemostasis and thrombosis and particularly in hemophilia.

She is conducting a number of international clinical research trials on potential new treatment options for patients with hemophilia.

Altman Clinical and Translational Research Building Makes Its Debut

New structure will be campus hub for advancing basic science to clinical applications —

Rising above Interstate 5 on the east campus of UC San Diego, the Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute Building (ACTRI) officially opened its doors Friday in a ribbon-cutting ceremony under blue skies.

The new seven-story building of steel, glass and grooved concrete is home to the Clinical and Translational Research Institute (CTRI) at UC San Diego, established in 2010 as part of a national consortium of 60 medical research institutions created to energize bench-to-bedside efforts. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute Building Opens March 4

Stunning structure will house array of scientists and centers dedicated to speeding basic research into new treatments and therapies —

Rising above Interstate 5 on the east campus of University of California, San Diego, the Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute Building (ACTRI), a five-sided polygon of glass, steel and grooved concrete, officially opens its doors March 4 in a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

“The building is an architectural marvel, but more important is what it represents and the work that will go on inside,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Gary Firestein

Dr. Gary Firestein

The director of the Clinical and Translational Research Institute at UC San Diego is Gary S. Firestein, MD, Professor of Medicine and Dean and Associate Vice Chancellor of Translational Medicine at UC San Diego.

CTRI opened in 2010 as a part of the national Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium through a five-year, $37.2 million grant from the National Center for Advancing Translational Science of the National Institutes of Health. CTRI received a $52 million renewal grant last year.

More about the activities of the CTRI

 

CAR Trials Drive Leukemia and Lymphoma Treatment in New Direction

Experimental cellular-immunotherapy may boost body’s ability to find and destroy specific cancers —

Cancer immunology is based upon boosting the body’s own immune system to vanquish malignancies. It is among the fastest growing areas of oncology research. Researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center have launched three clinical trials to test the safety and efficacy of a novel cellular-immunotherapy that uses modified T cells – one of the immune system’s primary weapons – to treat three different types of blood cancer that often defy existing therapies.

“Lymphomas and leukemias affect thousands of Americans every year and unfortunately a good number of them die as a direct consequence of the disease progression or toxicity from existing treatments,” said Januario E. Castro, MD … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Januario E. Castro, MDDr. Januario E. Castro is the principal investigator of the three ZUMA clinical trials of the potential treatment, KTE-C19. Dr. Castro is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation.
For more information about the trials, contact Amy Guzdar at (858) 822-6843 or aguzdar@ucsd.edu

UC San Diego Health Researchers Join Pancreatic Cancer “Dream Team”

November 10, 2015

International effort will seek to develop and test new therapies for deadly malignancy —

In an effort to advance research on one of the deadliest forms of cancer, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers Andrew Lowy, MD, and Tannishtha Reya, PhD, have been recruited for their expertise in preclinical modeling, clinical trials and stem cell biology to join a “dream team” of international pancreatic cancer researchers.

The three-year, $12-million effort, sponsored by Stand Up To Cancer, Cancer Research UK and The Lustgarten Foundation, will pursue a three-pronged strategy to better understand and reset so-called “super-enhancers” that may be abnormally active in pancreatic tumors. Super-enhancers are bits of DNA that can cause over-expression of genetic signals, fueling cancer cell growth. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Tannishtha Reya, PhD, is Professor of Pharmacology in the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Professor of Medicine in the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.