Leading Metabolics Researcher Joins UC San Diego School of Medicine

Alan Saltiel will head unified effort to create comprehensive diabetes center —

Alan R. Saltiel, PhD, whose studies of the hormone insulin have helped drive research of obesity, diabetes and other metabolic disorders across the nation, is joining University of California, San Diego School of Medicine as professor and director of a new Comprehensive Diabetes Center.

Saltiel, who most recently served as director of the Life Sciences Institute at University of Michigan, will bring together and expand UC San Diego’s diverse programs to better understand and treat diabetes and other metabolic disorders. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Saltiel joins the Department of Medicine as professor in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Training the Next Generation of Cancer Scientists

National Cancer Institute training grant has supported UC San Diego scholars since 1984

The University of California, San Diego received a $2.5 million Institutional Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to support four predoctoral and six postdoctoral scholars in the campus’s cancer training program. First awarded in 1984, the grant is the single longest-running NCI training grant at UC San Diego. The 2014 grant renewal will provide funding through 2019, when it will have completed 34 years of training for cancer investigators…. Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

More about the UC San Diego NIH/NCI Cancer Training Grant

Richard D. Kolodner Elected to Institute of Medicine

University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers Joseph G. Gleeson, MD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and professor of neurosciences and pediatrics, and Richard D. Kolodner, PhD, professor of medicine and Ludwig Cancer Research scientist, have been named new members of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), considered among the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center


Dr. Richard KolodnerGeneticist and biochemist Richard D. Kolodner, PhD, is a distinguished professor in the departments of medicine (Division of Hematology-Oncology) and cellular and molecular medicine at UC San Diego.

Kolodner co-leads the Laboratory of Cancer Genetics in the San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, which is located at UC San Diego.

At the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, he co-leads the Cancer Genomes and Networks research program with Trey Ideker, PhD, and is a member of the faculty of the Cancer Therapeutics Training (CT2) Program.

He is also a member of the Institute for Genomic Medicine and the Biomedical Sciences graduate program.

Kolodner was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2000 and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2008. His election to the Institute of Medicine brings to 10 the number of Department of Medicine faculty members who are members of the institute.

See other UC San Diego news stories about Dr. Kolodner and his work.

U.S. News and World Report Again Names UC San Diego One of Nation’s Top 10 Public Universities

The University of California, San Diego has been ranked 8th best public university and 38th best university in the nation by U.S. News and World Report’s 2013 Best Colleges guidebook released today. For more than a decade, the publication has listed UC San Diego among the nation’s top 10 public universities. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 rankings for medicine-related UC San Diego programs:

  • Biomedical engineering (undergraduate) – #5 in the nation
  • Biomedical/bioengineering (graduate) – #4
  • Best Medical Schools rankings
    • Primary care – #27
    • Research – #16
      • AIDS – #8
  • Biological sciences – #15
  • Chemistry – #21
    • Biochemistry – #10
  • Pharmacy – #23

In Memoriam: Samuel I. Rapaport, MD

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Samuel I. Rapaport, MD
1921 – 2011

Samuel I. Rapaport, MD, Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Medicine and Pathology at UC San Diego and a former chief of the Division of Hematology, died December 20, 2011, in Baltimore, Maryland. He was 90.

A renowned hematologist, physician-scientist and teacher, Rapaport was internationally recognized for his research on the biochemistry of blood coagulation and the mechanism of clotting in disease.

Dr. Sandy Shattil“Sam was a major figure in American and international hematology,” said Sanford Shattil, MD, Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Hematology-Oncology.

“He made seminal basic and translational contributions to our understanding of blood coagulation.”

Rapaport joined the UCSD School of Medicine faculty in 1974 as the first chief of the medicine service at the VA San Diego Healthcare System.

During 22 years at UCSD, he served as a chief of the Division of Hematology and directed both clinical and research laboratories in hematology.

“Sam Rapaport was the epitome of a triple-threat physician-scientist,” said David N. Bailey, MD, Distinguished Research Professor of Pathology and Pharmacy, Emeritus Professor and former chair of the Department of Pathology, and Deputy Dean of the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

“His teaching at all levels was superb,” Bailey said. “His clinical care was legendary, often extending into late-night patient visits, and his research was world-class.”

In the Department of Pathology, Rapaport founded and directed the Special Coagulation Laboratory for the UCSD Medical Center. Its director today is Dzung T. Le, MD, PhD, associate professor of clinical pathology, whom Rapaport mentored.

Said Le, “He was like a second father to me. Indeed, his treated his patients, his students, his laboratory technicians, his administrative assistants as if they were members of his own family.

“That was why many of his patients, his former colleagues and students remained good friends long after he retired. It was my distinct honor to be a member of his laboratory and to continue his legacy at the Special Coagulation Laboratory at UCSD.”

“I interacted with Sam in the formative years when we were both in the Department of Medicine,” said Palmer Taylor, PhD, who joined the School of Medicine as an assistant professor of pharmacology in 1971. “He brought to the Department a great balance of research and clinical skills.”

“Sam was an early supporter of the development of Pharmacology as the first basic science department and later the emergence of the School of Pharmacy from the planning stages,” Taylor said.

Taylor, the founding dean of the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is Sandra and Monroe Trout Professor of Pharmacology and Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences.

On the national scene, Rapaport was a major influence in the development of the American Society of Hematology and served as its president in 1977. He was active in numerous academic societies and advisory groups.

Dr. Kenneth Kaushansky“Sam was the consummate scholar; he approached medicine, and life, with verve, compassion, inquisitiveness and intelligence,” said Kenneth Kaushansky, MD, MACP, former Helen M. Ranney Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Medicine at UCSD.

Kaushansky is Senior Vice President, Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine at Stony Brook University in New York. Also a hematologist, he served as president of the American Society of Hematology in 2008.

“He embodied all the best in the profession,” Kaushansky said. “I am saddened to know the world took a big hit with his passing.”

Shattil said, “He was a beloved member of our Hematology-Oncology Division. We will greatly miss his sage, gentle advice and his friendship.”

“He was a kind, warm human being,” said Bailey. “He will be sorely missed.”

Biography

Samuel I. Rapaport was born in Los Angeles, CA, in 1921. He received his undergraduate degree at UCLA and his MD in 1945 from the University of Southern California School of Medicine. After his residency training at the Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, he remained on staff as faculty supervisor of the hematology ward.

In the early 1950s, his interest in blood coagulation led to a Fulbright scholarship for a year of research in Dr. Paul Owren’s laboratory in Norway. Rapaport returned to the Long Beach VA in 1954 and founded a clinical and research coagulation laboratory. He was soon recruited to UCLA to do the same.

In 1958, he was asked to establish a hematology division at the University of Southern California. There, too, he set up clinical and research coagulation laboratories. He went on to conduct groundbreaking investigations of the mechanisms of blood coagulation in health and disease, spending the last two decades of his career at UCSD. He retired from the University in 1996 at the age of 75.

Rapaport was a past president of the American Society of Hematology, the Western Association of Physicians and the Western Society for Clinical Research. He was a member of the American College of Physicians and the National Academy of Sciences. In 2008, he was named to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Profiles of Dr. Rapaport

Dr. Christopher Glass and Colleagues Awarded $38 Million to Continue Lipid Mapping Project

Christopher K. GlassDr. Christopher K. Glass and colleagues at UCSD have received a renewal award of nearly $38 million to lead the Lipid Metabolites and Pathways Strategy (MAPS) Project for another five years.

Begun in 2003, the Lipid MAPS project is a 16-center consortium study of the structure and function of lipids. Lipids play a role in many major disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Christopher K. Glass, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at UCSD. He is director of the LIPID MAPS Macrophage Biology Core.

Principal investigator of the Lipid MAPS consortium is Edward Dennis, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology and Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCSD. The project is funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.


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