2016 Update: A Lasting Solution for Healthcare in Mozambique

Mozambique highlighted on a map of Africa There is a critical shortage of practicing doctors and medical educators in Mozambique, where the life expectancy is less than 42 years and the rate of HIV infection in adults is 16%. UC San Diego is teaming with the nation’s flagship medical school to create a long-term solution.

Mozambique’s Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) and UCSD have won a five-year, $12.5-million award from the U.S. Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI). The project will strengthen the nation’s medical education system by building infrastructure in several ways.


“We hope this will be a demonstration project for the rest of Africa.”
— Dr. Robert Schooley


Dr. Emilia Virginia Noormahomed, a co-investigator on the UCSD-UEM MEPI project.UEM’s principal investigator is Emilia Virginia Noormahomed, MD, PhD, a former dean of the UEM School of Medicine. Dr. Noormahomed (pictured at left) is now Assistant Professor of Parasitology at UEM and Assistant Professor of Medicine at UC San Diego.

Sam Patel, MD, Professor of Medicine at UEM and UC San Diego, is a co-investigator. In the photo below, he is pictured on the right.

View photo captions and credits

Dr. Bill Detmer, at left, demonstrates iPad mobile digital device preloaded with medical programs for doctors’ use in the hospital. Dr. Manuel Joaquim Tomás is at center and Dr. Sam Patel at right. Sam Patel, M.D., co-investigator on the MEPI project, is Professor of Medicine at UEM and UCSD. Bill Detmer, M.D., M.Sc., a MEPI project consultant, is Assistant Adjunct Professor of Clinical Informatics at the University of Virginia and President and Chief Executive Officer of Unbound Medicine.

MEPI is a joint initiative of the National Institutes of Health and the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Under the MEPI program, UEM receives the bulk of the funding and uses it to build capacity in medical training, research, and technology.

A smaller amount of funding comes directly to UC San Diego, supporting time and travel for the partners and mentors who will help UEM meet its goals.

M. Wilson Tilghman, M.D., UCSD’s on-site faculty member in Mozambique, consults with a UEM internal medicine resident at a patient’s bedside. Instituting the use of wirelessly-accessed medical reference material in the hospital is one of the UCSD-UEM project goals.“This is an experiment in medical education for UEM and for the U.S. government,” said Robert “Chip” Schooley, MD, who is coordinating the UC San Diego side of the project. “It puts the funding into the hands of the African universities and allows them to invest it in ways that are beneficial to them.”

Dr. Schooley is Professor and Academic Affairs Vice Chair in the Department of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases.

“I’m hopeful this will become a model for other kinds of aid,” he said.

Dr. Schooley and colleague Constance Benson, MD, have long experience in partnering with Mozambique and other African nations, and they have collaborated with Dr. Noormahomed in research projects for several years. Dr. Benson is Professor of Medicine, Director of the UC San Diego Antiviral Research Center, and Director of the Fellowship Program in Infectious Diseases.

The UEM-UCSD MEPI project expands some of the educational efforts that have been going on since July 2009 in the Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Global Medicine elective.

UC San Diego’s visiting faculty and residents have helped UEM adopt academic medical practices such as morning report and teaching conferences that strengthen the educational program.

MEPI biomedical informatics team members at October conference at UEM in Maputo.

MEPI biomedical informatics team members at October conference at UEM in Maputo.

The MEPI partnership relies heavily on biomedical informatics to accomplish its goals. This component of the program is led by Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Chief of UC San Diego’s Division of Biomedical Informatics. The division will provide expertise for the partnership’s information technology projects.

Dr. Kathy Promer, a 2013 graduate of the UC San Diego Internal Medicine Program, is the current infectious diseases fellow at UC San Diego on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital. In the photo below, she is standing, second from the right.

Dr. Kathy Promer (standing, second from the right), 2013 Graduate of the UCSD Internal Medicine Program and current infectious diseases fellow at UCSD on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital.

Smartphones and iPad mobile digital devices have been deployed on the wards at Maputo Central Hospital, UEM’s primary teaching hospital and the only tertiary care center in Mozambique. With these devices, the Mozambican doctors are able for the first time to consult online medical literature at a patient’s bedside. Soon they will have immediate access to data generated by the hospital’s clinical laboratories.

“These efforts really have changed the character of the residency program at Maputo Central Hospital,” said Dr. Schooley.

Through training and partnership with UC San Diego, UEM will also increase its capacity to do operational, epidemiological, translational and clinical research. Another program goal calls for UEM to set up a biomedical informatics infrastructure and connect with SEACOM, the new fiber optic broadband internet service in South and East Africa.

Students in UEM medical school class.UEM will also take steps to enhance its support of two new medical schools recently established by the Mozambican government in Nampula and Tete. These two new medical schools were launched in the past 3 years to address the profound shortage of physicians in the country.

Another key UC San Diego figure in the project is Stephen Bickler, MD, who will work to improve the nation’s surgical capacity in rural areas via a linked MEPI project, “UEM-UCSD Surgery Partnership.” Dr. Bickler is Associate Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics.

A number of other UC San Diego faculty members will contribute to the MEPI effort as well.

Medical school class   UCSD internal medicine resident Dr. Bethany Karl

Above left, a medical school class at Universidade Eduardo Mondlane. Right, Dr. Bethany Karl on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital. Dr. Karl graduated from the UC San Diego Internal Medicine Program in 2010 and is currently a nephrology attending. Photo courtesy of Robert T. Schooley, MD

Project leaders expect to double the number of graduating doctors in Mozambique in the next 10 years. They also hope to inspire more doctors to devote their careers to medical education.

With a greater number of highly-trained doctors and a better infrastructure to support them, Mozambique will increase its capacity to deliver health care to its citizens and to fill the faculties of two new medical schools in Nampula and Tete.

The doctors training today in Mozambique will be the specialists, medical school faculty members, and government Ministry of Health policymakers of the future.

“We hope this will be a demonstration project for the rest of Africa,” Dr. Schooley said.

Read the UC San Diego News press release about our MEPI project.

Read about the project in “The Great Beyond,” Nature magazine’s blog
for breaking news in the sciences.


Photo Captions and Credits:

Dr. Emilia Virginia Noormahomed, co-principal investigator on the UCSD-UEM MEPI project.Dr. Emilia Virginia Noormahomed, co-principal investigator on the UC San Diego-UEM MEPI project. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, MD, MSc.

Drs. Detmer, Tomás, and PatelDr. Bill Detmer, left, demonstrates iPad mobile digital device preloaded with medical programs for doctors’ use in the hospital. Dr. Manuel Joaquim Tomás is at center and Dr. Sam Patel at right. Sam Patel, MD, co-investigator on the MEPI project, is Professor of Medicine at UEM and UC San Diego. William M. Detmer, MD, MSc, a MEPI project consultant, is Assistant Adjunct Professor of Clinical Informatics at the University of Virginia and President and Chief Executive Officer of Unbound Medicine. Photo courtesy of Dr. Detmer.

Dr. Tilghman and Mozambican residentM. Wilson Tilghman, MD, UC San Diego’s on-site faculty member in Mozambique, consults with a UEM internal medicine resident at a patient’s bedside. Instituting the use of wirelessly-accessed medical reference material in the hospital is one of the UC San Diego-UEM project goals. Photo courtesy of Robert T. Schooley, MD.

MEPI biomedical informatics team members at October conference at UEM in Maputo. MEPI biomedical informatics team members at October conference at UEM in Maputo. From left: Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD; Eli Aronoff-Spencer, MD, senior postdoctoral fellow in infectious diseases at UC San Diego; Eng. David Bila, Network Director for the Informatics Center at UEM; Heimar de Fátima Marin, RN, PhD, Professor of Health Informatics at Universidade Federal de São Paulo; and Eng. Francisco Mabila, Director of the Informatics Center at UEM. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, MD, MSc.

Dr. Kathy Promer (standing, second from the right), is a 2013 graduate of the UC San Diego Internal Medicine Program and is the current infectious diseases fellow at UC San Diego on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital.

Students in a medical school class at UEM.Students in a medical school class at UEM. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, MD, MSc.

A medical school class at UEM.A medical school class at UEM. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, MD, MSc.

UCSD internal medicine resident Dr. Bethany Karl on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital.UC San Diego internal medicine resident Dr. Bethany Karl on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital. Photo courtesy of Robert T. Schooley, MD.

Trademark Credit Notices:

iPad is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

Big Data Sharing for Better Health

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have been awarded a $9.2 million grant to help modernize and transform how researchers share, use, find and cite biomedical datasets.

The 3-year project, in collaboration with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, is part of a federal initiative to increase the utility of biomedical research data, launched this week by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through its Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) program. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Lucila Ohno-MachadoLucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, is lead investigator on the Biomedical and healthCAre Data Discovery and Indexing Ecosystem (BioCADDIE) project.

Dr. Ohno-Machado, professor of medicine, is founding chief of the Division of Biomedical Informatics.

Read the BioCADDIE project description on the NIH RePORTER

IDASH Projects: Protecting Privacy and Patient Rights in the Name of Scientific Progress

In the years since the best-selling book “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” made the issue of informed consent and patient privacy a national topic of conversation, scientists and clinicians have continued to struggle to develop a comprehensive methodology for collecting and sharing data from patients and research subjects without jeopardizing their rights.

The University of California, San Diego’s iDASH project aims to address some of these fundamental challenges to research progress with its most recent series of “Driving Biological Projects” (DBPs) … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. Lucila Ohno-MachadoLead investigator in the iDASH project is Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, MBA, PhD, professor of medicine, founding chief of the Division of Biomedical Informatics and associate dean for informatics and technology at UC San Diego.

Among other research and education projects directed by Dr. Ohno-Machado are the Biomedical Research Informatics for Global Health training program and the biomedical informatics component of the UC San Diego – Universidade Eduardo Mondlane Medical Education Partnership Initiative.  |  See all DBMI research projects

Dr. Ohno-Machado joined the UC San Diego faculty from Harvard Medical School in 2009. She was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation in 2010.

More Information:

Toward a New Model of the Cell

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Genes

Turning vast amounts of genomic data into meaningful information about the cell is the great challenge of bioinformatics, with major implications for human biology and medicine. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and colleagues have proposed a new method that creates a computational model of the cell from large networks of gene and protein interactions, discovering how genes and proteins connect to form higher-level cellular machinery. …Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Trey Ideker, PhDThe new approach comes from the medical genetics laboratory of Trey Ideker, PhD, in the departments of bioengineering and medicine. Postdoctoral fellow Janusz Dutkowski, PhD, is lead author and Michael Kramer, PhD, a coauthor of the study report in Nature Biotechnology.

Ideker, senior author, is professor of bioengineering and medicine and chief of the Division of Medical Genetics in the Department of Medicine.

Citation for the report:  Dutkowski J, Kramer M, Surma MA, Balakrishnan R, Cherry JM, Krogan NJ, Ideker T. A gene ontology inferred from molecular networks. Nature Biotechnology (2012) doi:10.1038/nbt.2463. Published online 16 December 2012  Read the abstract

Tumor Metastasis with a Twist

Protein is key to early embryonic development, but later promotes spread of cancer

In the early stages of human embryogenesis, a transcription factor called Twist1 plays a key regulatory role in how the embryo assumes form and function. Much later in life, however, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, say Twist1 can re-emerge, taking a darker and more deadly turn…. Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado (pictured) and Jihoon Kim of the Division of Biomedical Informatics are among the authors of the study report. Lucila Ohno-Machado, M.D., Ph.D., is professor and chief of the division; Jihoon Kim, M.S., is senior statistician. Read the published article (full text).

Photo of Dr. Ohno-Machado: John Hanacek, Calit2 UC San Diego.

A Lasting Solution for Healthcare in Mozambique

Mozambique highlighted on a map of Africa There is a critical shortage of practicing doctors and medical educators in Mozambique, where the life expectancy is less than 42 years and the rate of HIV infection in adults is 16%. Now, UCSD is teaming with the nation’s flagship medical school to create a long-term solution.

Mozambique’s Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) and UCSD have won a five-year, $12.5-million award from the U.S. Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI). The project will strengthen the nation’s medical education system by building infrastructure in several ways.


“We hope this will be a demonstration project for the rest of Africa.”
— Dr. Robert Schooley


Dr. Emilia Virginia Noormahomed, a co-investigator on the UCSD-UEM MEPI project.UEM’s principal investigator is Emilia Virginia Noormahomed, M.D., Ph.D., a former dean of the UEM School of Medicine. Dr. Noormahomed (pictured at left) is now Assistant Professor of Parasitology at UEM and Assistant Professor of Medicine at UCSD.

Sam Patel, M.D., Professor of Medicine at UEM and UCSD, is a co-investigator. In the photo below, he is pictured on the right.

View photo captions and credits

Dr. Bill Detmer, at left, demonstrates iPad mobile digital device preloaded with medical programs for doctors’ use in the hospital. Dr. Manuel Joaquim Tomás is at center and Dr. Sam Patel at right. Sam Patel, M.D., co-investigator on the MEPI project, is Professor of Medicine at UEM and UCSD. Bill Detmer, M.D., M.Sc., a MEPI project consultant, is Assistant Adjunct Professor of Clinical Informatics at the University of Virginia and President and Chief Executive Officer of Unbound Medicine.

MEPI is a joint initiative of the National Institutes of Health and the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Under the MEPI program, UEM receives the bulk of the funding and uses it to build capacity in medical training, research, and technology.

A smaller amount of funding comes directly to UCSD, supporting time and travel for the partners and mentors who will help UEM meet its goals.

M. Wilson Tilghman, M.D., UCSD’s on-site faculty member in Mozambique, consults with a UEM internal medicine resident at a patient’s bedside. Instituting the use of wirelessly-accessed medical reference material in the hospital is one of the UCSD-UEM project goals.“This is an experiment in medical education for UEM and for the U.S. government,” said Robert “Chip” Schooley, M.D., who is coordinating the UCSD side of the project. “It puts the funding into the hands of the African universities and allows them to invest it in ways that are beneficial to them.”

Dr. Schooley is Professor and Academic Affairs Vice Chair in the Department of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases.

“I’m hopeful this will become a model for other kinds of aid,” he said.

Dr. Schooley and colleague Constance Benson, M.D., have long experience in partnering with Mozambique and other African nations, and they have collaborated with Dr. Noormahomed in research projects for several years. Dr. Benson is Professor of Medicine, Director of the UCSD Antiviral Research Center, and Director of the Fellowship Program in Infectious Diseases.

The UEM-UCSD MEPI project expands some of the educational efforts that have been going on since July 2009 in the Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Global Medicine elective.

UCSD’s visiting faculty and residents have helped UEM adopt academic medical practices such as morning report and teaching conferences that strengthen the educational program.

MEPI biomedical informatics team members at October conference at UEM in Maputo.

MEPI biomedical informatics team members at October conference at UEM in Maputo.

The MEPI partnership relies heavily on biomedical informatics to accomplish its goals. This component of the program is led by Lucila Ohno-Machado, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Medicine and Chief of UCSD’s Division of Biomedical Informatics. The division will provide expertise for the partnership’s information technology projects.

UCSD infectious diseases fellow Eli Aronoff-Spencer, MD (left), and Dr. Manuel Joaquim Tomás, UEM internal medicine resident on hospital ward in Maputo.

Smartphones and iPad mobile digital devices have been deployed on the wards at Maputo Central Hospital, UEM’s primary teaching hospital and the only tertiary care center in Mozambique. With these devices, the Mozambican doctors are able for the first time to consult online medical literature at a patient’s bedside. Soon they will have immediate access to data generated by the hospital’s clinical laboratories.

“These efforts really have changed the character of the residency program at Maputo Central Hospital,” said Dr. Schooley.

Elaine Muchmore, M.D., Professor of Medicine and Director of the UCSD Internal Medicine Residency Training Program, will work closely with UEM to strengthen and expand the Mozambican training programs.

Through training and partnership with UCSD, UEM will also increase its capacity to do operational, epidemiological, translational and clinical research. Another program goal calls for UEM to set up a biomedical informatics infrastructure and connect with SEACOM, the new fiber optic broadband internet service in South and East Africa.

Students in UEM medical school class.UEM will also take steps to enhance its support of two new medical schools recently established by the Mozambican government in Nampula and Tete. These two new medical schools were launched in the past 3 years to address the profound shortage of physicians in the country.

Another key UCSD figure in the project is Stephen Bickler, M.D., who will work to improve the nation’s surgical capacity in rural areas via a linked MEPI project, “UEM-UCSD Surgery Partnership.” Dr. Bickler is Associate Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics.

A number of other UCSD faculty members will contribute to the MEPI effort as well.

Medical school class   UCSD internal medicine resident Dr. Bethany Karl

Above left, a medical school class at Universidade Eduardo Mondlane. Right, UCSD internal medicine resident Dr. Bethany Karl on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital in Mozambique.

Project leaders expect to double the number of graduating doctors in Mozambique in the next 10 years. They also hope to inspire more doctors to devote their careers to medical education.

With a greater number of highly-trained doctors and a better infrastructure to support them, Mozambique will increase its capacity to deliver health care to its citizens and to fill the faculties of two new medical schools in Nampula and Tete.

The doctors training today in Mozambique will be the specialists, medical school faculty members, and government Ministry of Health policymakers of the future.

“We hope this will be a demonstration project for the rest of Africa,” Dr. Schooley said.

Read the UCSD News press release about our MEPI project.

Read about the project in “The Great Beyond,” Nature magazine’s blog
for breaking news in the sciences.


Photo Captions and Credits:

Dr. Emilia Virginia Noormahomed, co-principal investigator on the UCSD-UEM MEPI project.Dr. Emilia Virginia Noormahomed, co-principal investigator on the UCSD-UEM MEPI project. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, M.D., M.Sc.

Drs. Detmer, Tomás, and PatelDr. Bill Detmer, left, demonstrates iPad mobile digital device preloaded with medical programs for doctors’ use in the hospital. Dr. Manuel Joaquim Tomás is at center and Dr. Sam Patel at right. Sam Patel, M.D., co-investigator on the MEPI project, is Professor of Medicine at UEM and UCSD. William M. Detmer, M.D., M.Sc., a MEPI project consultant, is Assistant Adjunct Professor of Clinical Informatics at the University of Virginia and President and Chief Executive Officer of Unbound Medicine. Photo courtesy of Dr. Detmer.

Dr. Tilghman and Mozambican residentM. Wilson Tilghman, M.D., UCSD’s on-site faculty member in Mozambique, consults with a UEM internal medicine resident at a patient’s bedside. Instituting the use of wirelessly-accessed medical reference material in the hospital is one of the UCSD-UEM project goals. Photo courtesy of Robert T. Schooley, M.D.

MEPI biomedical informatics team members at October conference at UEM in Maputo. MEPI biomedical informatics team members at October conference at UEM in Maputo. From left: Lucila Ohno-Machado, M.D., Ph.D.; Eli Aronoff-Spencer, M.D., senior postdoctoral fellow in infectious diseases at UCSD; Eng. David Bila, Network Director for the Informatics Center at UEM; Heimar de Fátima Marin, RN, PhD, Professor of Health Informatics at Universidade Federal de São Paulo; and Eng. Francisco Mabila, Director of the Informatics Center at UEM. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, M.D., M.Sc.

UCSD infectious diseases fellow Eli Aronoff-Spencer, MD (left), and Dr. Manuel Joaquim Tomás, UEM internal medicine resident on hospital ward in Maputo.UCSD infectious diseases fellow Eli Aronoff-Spencer, MD (left), and Dr. Manuel Joaquim Tomás, UEM internal medicine resident on hospital ward in Maputo. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, M.D., M.Sc.

Students in a medical school class at UEM.Students in a medical school class at UEM. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, M.D., M.Sc.

A medical school class at UEM.A medical school class at UEM. Photo courtesy of William M. Detmer, M.D., M.Sc.

UCSD internal medicine resident Dr. Bethany Karl on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital.UCSD internal medicine resident Dr. Bethany Karl on rotation at UEM’s Maputo Central Hospital. Photo courtesy of Robert T. Schooley, M.D.

Trademark Credit Notices:

iPad is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado Elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado, Professor of Medicine and founding chief of the Division of Biomedical Informatics, has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI).

Membership in the ASCI is a distinction that recognizes the nation’s most outstanding physician-scientists.

The honorees for 2010 were introduced April 24 at a joint meeting of the ASCI and the Association of American Physicians in Chicago.

Lucila Ohno-Machado, M.D., Ph.D., is a groundbreaking researcher and a respected director of advanced training programs in biomedical informatics. She joined the Department of Medicine faculty from Harvard Medical School in 2009.

“Lucila has always been a leader, and she will continue to lead UCSD in new directions in biomedical informatics, developing critical new tools that will help both basic researchers and clinicians in moving their programs forward,” said Kenneth Kaushansky, M.D., M.A.C.P., Helen M. Ranney Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Medicine.

“Her election to ASCI highlights both her accomplishments and the increasing recognition of her field as a critical component of the academic medical center,” he said.

Dr. Ohno-Machado’s primary research interest is prognostic modeling, the development of statistical models to predict clinical outcomes. She is principal investigator of an NIH-funded grant to develop methods for improving the calibration of prognostic models and of another research project funded by the Komen Foundation to validate breast cancer biomarkers using computational techniques.

Dr. Ohno-Machado received her M.D. degree from the University of São Paulo and her Ph.D. in Medical Information Sciences and Computer Science from Stanford University.

She is an elected fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. She serves as associate editor for both the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association and the Journal of Biomedical Informatics.

Since 2004, during her tenure at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital of Harvard Medical School, Dr. Ohno-Machado has directed the Biomedical Research Informatics for Global Health Training (BRIGHT) Program, an educational consortium funded by the Fogarty International Center of the NIH.

The aim of the program is to unite U.S. researchers and institutions in a collaborative effort to conduct research and to develop informatics research training programs in low- and middle-income countries.

In its first five years, the program concentrated its efforts in Brazil, where it developed a certificate program in clinical informatics and supported a new doctoral program in bioinformatics at the University of São Paulo.

With a new 5-year, $1.23-million grant awarded last fall, the BRIGHT program is expanding its efforts to include Maputo, Mozambique, as well as additional areas of Brazil.

$1.23M Grant Will Fund Biomedical Research Informatics for Global Health Training

Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhDThe National Institutes of Health has awarded $1.23 million to a team of UC San Diego researchers led by Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine and founding Chief of the new Division of Biomedical Informatics.

The award, which comes from the Fogarty International Center, will support multi-departmental efforts under the Biomedical Research Informatics for Global Health Training (BRIGHT) Program.


Read the full story
from UC San Diego News


 

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado Is Chief of New Division of Biomedical Informatics

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado

The Department of Medicine has appointed Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado, a leading medical information scientist and educator from Harvard Medical School, to head the new Division of Biomedical Informatics.

Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, started in her new position at UC San Diego on July 1.

Dr. Ohno-Machado has performed groundbreaking research and directed advanced training programs in the field of biomedical informatics. Her primary research interest is prognostic modeling, the development of statistical models to predict clinical outcomes.

Read more about Dr. Ohno-Machado and the new Biomedical Informatics division in the UC San Diego News release.

Recent Publications from Dr. Ohno-Machado

  • Racowsky C, Ohno-Machado L, Kim J, Biggers JD: Is there an advantage in scoring early embryos on more than one day? Hum Reprod. 2009 (in press).   Abstract
  • Matheny ME, Morrow DA, Ohno-Machado L, Cannon, CP, Sabatine, MS, Resnic FS: Validation of an Automated Safety Surveillance System with Prospective, Randomized Trial Data. Medical Decision Making. 2009; Mar-Apr;29(2):247-56.   Abstract
  • Curtis DW, Pino EJ, Bailey JM, Shih EI, Waterman J, Vinterbo SA, Stair TO, Guttag JV, Greenes RA, Ohno-Machado L: SMART–an integrated wireless system for monitoring unattended patients. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2008 Jan-Feb;15(1):44-53.   Abstract
  • Robles V, Bielza C, Larranaga P, Gonzales S, Ohno-Machado L: Optimizing logistic regression coefficients for discrimination and calibration using estimation of distribution algorithms. TOP. 2008;16(2):345-66.   Full Text PDF (UCSD only)
  • Matheny ME, Ohno-Machado L, Resnic FS: Risk-adjusted sequential probability ratio test control chart methods for monitoring operator and institutional mortality rates in interventional cardiology. Am Heart J. 2008 Jan;155(1):114-20.   Abstract
  • Matheny ME, Resnic FS, Arora N, Ohno-Machado L: Effects of SVM parameter optimization on discrimination and calibration for post-procedural PCI mortality. J Biomed Inform. 2007 Dec;40(6):688-97.   Abstract