How to Reset a Diseased Cell

In proof-of-concept experiments, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine demonstrate the ability to tune medically relevant cell behaviors by manipulating a key hub in cell communication networks. The manipulation of this communication node, reported in this week’s issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, makes it possible to reprogram large parts of a cell’s signaling network instead of targeting only a single receptor or cell signaling pathway. …Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


New Cellular Pathway Triggering Allergic Asthma Response Identified

With molecular target found comes possibility of new therapies for millions of Americans —

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators in Korea and Scotland, have identified a novel signaling pathway critical to the immune response of cells associated with the initiation of allergic asthma. The discovery, they say, could point the way to new therapies that suppress the inflammatory allergic response, offering potential relief to millions of Americans with the chronic lung condition and potentially other allergic diseases.

The results are published in the January 19 online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. . … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Eyal Raz

Dr. Eyal Raz

Principal investigator of the study is Eyal Raz, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, whose research focuses on the fundamentals of innate immunity.

First author of the report is Jihyung Lee, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Raz lab.

Coauthors include David H. Broide, MB, ChB, professor of medicine and director of the division’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-funded T32 training program in molecular and cell biology of allergy; Paul Insel, MD, professor of pharmacology and medicine; Maripat Corr, MD, professor of medicine; project scientist Jongdae Lee, PhD; all in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology; and Nicholas Webster, PhD, professor of medicine and chief of the UC San Diego Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism.

View article abstract

Potential New Way to Suppress Tumor Growth Discovered

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the University of Rochester Medical Center, have identified a new mechanism that appears to suppress tumor growth, opening the possibility of developing a new class of anti-cancer drugs. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. Willis X. Li

Dr. Willis X. Li

Senior author of the study report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is Willis X. Li, PhD, professor of medicine in the Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine and faculty member in the Biomedical Sciences graduate program.

Li’s UC San Diego Department of Medicine coauthors are postdoctoral fellow Pranabananda Dutta, PhD; pulmonary/critical care physician-scientist Jinghong Li, MD, PhD, and senior undergraduate student Jingtong Wang.

Coauthors Xiaoyu Hu, Amy Tsurumi and Hartmut Land are colleagues at the University of Rochester, where Li was a faculty member and researcher at the Wilmot Cancer Center before he joined the faculty at UC San Diego.

At the University of Rochester, LI received the 2008 Davey Memorial Award for Outstanding Cancer Research for his work in the cellular and molecular signaling in cancer development.

He is now principal investigator of an R01 research grant from the National Cancer Institute for the project, Epigenetic Tumor Induction by Heterochromatin Instability.

Citation for the study report:  

Xiaoyu Hu, Pranabananda Dutta, Amy Tsurumi, Jinghong Li, Jingtong Wang, Hartmut Land, and Willis X. Li. Unphosphorylated STAT5A stabilizes heterochromatin and suppresses tumor growth. PNAS 2013 ; published ahead of print June 3, 2013, doi:10.1073/pnas.1221243110  |  Abstract  |  Full text (PDF)

Powerful Approach to the Analysis of Protein Motions

DXMS analysis provides novel tool for studying how movements allow proteins to perform their functions as molecular machines

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston have concluded a study that offers a new understanding of the role that motions, or dynamics, play in the functioning of the protein Epac2. Their work provides information likely to help scientists design drugs to battle major diseases in which Epac2 plays a role, such as diabetes and cancer. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Virgil L. Woods, Jr., MD

The study’s UC San Diego principal investigator is Virgil L. Woods, Jr., MD, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology (pictured). First author Sheng Li, PhD, is chief scientist in the UCSD DXMS Proteomics Resource.

Jean Y.J. Wang Elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Jean Yin Jen Wang, PhD, professor of medicine and biology in the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, was elected today with 211 other distinguished scientists, scholars, writers, artists, business and civic leaders to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Dr. Jean Y. J. Wang is Distinguished Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology-Oncology and Associate Director for Basic Research at the UCSD Moores Cancer Center.