SDSC/UCSD Study Uncovers Mechanisms of Cancer-Causing Mutations

Computer modeling leads to more precise targeting of therapies —

Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego, have described for the first time the molecular mechanism of cancer development caused by well-known “resistance” mutations in the gene called epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

While these mutations were known for quite a long time, the question as to why they cause cancer or make some drugs ineffective was still not answered.

The study, called “Molecular Determinants of Drug-Specific Sensitivity for Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Exon 19 and 20 Mutants in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer,” and published online in the journal Oncotarget, demonstrates how computer modeling of EGFR mutations found in lung cancer can elucidate their molecular mechanism of action and consequently optimize the selection of therapeutic agents to treat patients. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Razelle Kurzrock

Dr. Razelle Kurzrock

The senior investigator in the study was Razelle Kurzrock, MD. Dr. Kurzrock is Chief of the Division of Hematology & Oncology; Murray Professor of Medicine; Senior Deputy Director, Clinical Science and
Director, Center for Personalized Cancer Therapy and Clinical Trials Office at the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center.

Lyudmila A. Bazhenova, MD, associate professor of medicine and leader of the Lung Cancer Unit Team at the Moores Cancer Center, was also an investigator in the study.

Read the study report (UC San Diego only)

Hannah Carter Receives NIH Early Independence Award

CTRI Helps Launch Career of Bioengineer Hannah Carter

November 22, 2013 – With support from UC San Diego’s Clinical and Translational Research Institute (CTRI), bioengineer Hannah Carter, PhD, received the highly prestigious NIH Early Independence Award and recently began began her transition to a junior faculty position at UC San Diego.

Presently she is acquiring a research team and computational resources to delve into her project: Network approaches to identify cancer drivers from high-dimensional tumor data. … Read the full story from CTRI News & Events


Hannah Carter, PhDHannah Carter, PhD, is assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Medical Genetics. Her project is Network Approaches to Identify Cancer Drivers from High-Dimensional Tumor Data.

She is now recruiting postdoctoral fellows for her project, which is funded for five years.

Carter Laboratory website