Mother Delivers Baby, Develops Heart Disease

UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center among first in region to implant cardiac device

Three weeks after delivering her first child, Amanda began to suffer from extreme fatigue, headaches, a tight chest and stomach pain. An initial diagnosis of pneumonia changed for the worse: Amanda was experiencing heart failure. She was quickly transferred to UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center where a multidisciplinary team implanted a novel cardiac device under her skin, leaving the heart untouched, to prevent sudden cardiac arrest. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center

Bringing Power of Prevention, Diagnosis to the People

“A Mercedes Benz isn’t designed to function in the Sahara Desert,” notes Dr. Eliah Aronoff-Spencer of the University of California, San Diego. “So why are we designing medical equipment for developing countries the same way we do for developed ones?”

It’s a question researchers at the new Distributed Health Laboratory in the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at UC San Diego aim to address, and eventually, to render moot. In collaboration with the UC San Diego School of Medicine and the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) in Maputo, Mozambique, Calit2’s DH Lab is designing low-cost medical devices such as microscopes and wireless sensing devices that can be used by virtually anyone anywhere in the world to prevent and even diagnose illness. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Co-directing the Distributed Health Laboratory is Eliah Aronoff-Spencer, MD, PhD, fellow in infectious diseases at UCSD and informatics coordinator for the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) between UC San Diego and Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) in Maputo, Mozambique.

Eliah Aronoff-Spencer, MD, PhD with Dr. Manuel TomasThe photo at left shows Dr. Aronoff-Spencer with UEM physician Dr. Manuel Tomás (at right) on a patient ward at Maputo Central Hospital.

Dr. Aronoff-Spencer is also an organizer of the Biomedical Research Informatics for Global Health Training (BRIGHT) program, an international collaboration devoted to training the next generation of informatics researchers in partner countries.

The BRIGHT program, a Division of Biomedical Informatics project, is funded by grant D43TW007015 from the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health.

A graduate of the UCSD Internal Medicine Residency Program and Physician-Scientist Training Pathway, Dr. Aronoff-Spencer has completed a fellowship in clinical infectious disease and is now a fellow in research in infectious disease, global health informatics and decision making at UCSD. He is also a staff physician in infectious disease at the VA San Diego Healthcare System.

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UC San Diego Center for Transplantation “VAD Destination Therapy” Approved

Heart failure patients with few options find future in mechanical devices

The Joint Commission has approved UC San Diego Health System’s Disease-Specific Care Certification for Ventricular Assist Device (VAD). Hospitals performing VAD as a “destination therapy” (for permanent use) receive a certification of distinction and receive reimbursement from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services… Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Co-directing the VAD program is Eric Adler, MD, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor in the Division of Cardiology. Dr. Adler co-directs the Ventricular Assist Devices program with Jack Copeland, MD, at the UCSD Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center (pictured above).

In the Media: Dr. Daniel Blanchard

Dr. Daniel Blanchard is one of the cardiologists featured in the San Diego Business Journal story, “Scripps to Unveil Results of Medical Device Study.” Dr. Blanchard comments on a new hand-held ultrasound scanner as a potential replacement for traditional cardiac ultrasound, or echocardiography.

Daniel Blanchard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of Cardiology, is Chief of Clinical Cardiology at Thornton Hospital.