Researchers Boost Body’s Inflammation-Reduction Mechanism to Combat Obesity-Fueled Disease

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and University College Dublin (UCD) have found that augmenting a naturally occurring molecule in the body can help protect against obesity-related diseases by reducing inflammation in the fat tissues. The study, published June 4 in the journal Cell Metabolism, focused on liver and kidney diseases, but the researchers believe it could lead to a new therapeutic approach for a variety of obesity-fueled conditions.

“This is a new way of reducing inflammation and protecting organs, using a compound that’s already produced by the body,” said co-senior author Kumar Sharma, MD, a professor of medicine and director of the Center for Renal Translational Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine. “Essentially, we’re boosting the body’s natural response for reducing inflammation and showing the benefit in obesity-driven diseases.” … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

Drug Effective in Treating Kidney Disease in Diabetic Patients

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Mayo Clinic have published promising results of a clinical study using an experimental anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory drug called pirfenidone to treat patients with diabetic nephropathy. Their study will be published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN)…. Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Dr. Kumar Sharma

Kumar Sharma, MD, FAHA, is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Nephrology-Hypertension and Director of the UCSD Center for Renal Translational Medicine. He is lead investigator of the study, which was published in the April 21 issue of Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). Read the abstract of the published report.

Other Division of Nephrology-Hypertension faculty authors are Joachim H. Ix, MD, MAS, FASN, Assistant Professor of Medicine; and Satish P. RamachandraRao, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine.