Two Lefts Make It Right: Cardiac Experts Find Novel Approach to Treat Heart Failure

Circulatory assist devices placed on both sides of heart restore normal blood flow —

A teenage girl faced with sudden rapid heart deterioration, a man in the prime years of his life suffering from debilitating heart failure and a former NFL athlete crippled by end-stage heart failure were all successfully treated with a surgical approach pioneered by cardiac experts at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

The work, recently published in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, demonstrated significant benefits of implanting a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) in the right atrium to provide better blood flow through the lungs, giving complete biventricular circulatory support and fully replacing the heart’s function. …Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

Mother Delivers Baby, Develops Heart Disease

UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center among first in region to implant cardiac device

Three weeks after delivering her first child, Amanda began to suffer from extreme fatigue, headaches, a tight chest and stomach pain. An initial diagnosis of pneumonia changed for the worse: Amanda was experiencing heart failure. She was quickly transferred to UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center where a multidisciplinary team implanted a novel cardiac device under her skin, leaving the heart untouched, to prevent sudden cardiac arrest. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center

UC San Diego Center for Transplantation “VAD Destination Therapy” Approved

Heart failure patients with few options find future in mechanical devices

The Joint Commission has approved UC San Diego Health System’s Disease-Specific Care Certification for Ventricular Assist Device (VAD). Hospitals performing VAD as a “destination therapy” (for permanent use) receive a certification of distinction and receive reimbursement from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services… Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Co-directing the VAD program is Eric Adler, MD, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor in the Division of Cardiology. Dr. Adler co-directs the Ventricular Assist Devices program with Jack Copeland, MD, at the UCSD Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center (pictured above).