Researchers Illuminate Key Role of NOX Proteins in Liver Disease

Study adds credence to new treatment approach now in clinical trials —

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated a direct connection between two signaling proteins and liver fibrosis, a scarring process underlying chronic liver disease, the 12th leading cause of death in the United States.

The finding adds further credence to a current pharmaceutical effort to create new treatments for diabetic nephropathy, liver fibrosis and other progressive fibrotic and inflammatory diseases, based on blocking these two molecules, both members of the NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase (NOX) family of proteins. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego News Center


David A. Brenner, MDSenior author of the study report is David A. Brenner, MD, vice chancellor for health sciences, dean of UC San Diego School of Medicine and professor in the Division of Gastroenterology. The report was published online in PLOS ONE on July 29.

Read the article (open access)

Enzyme Restores Function with Diabetic Kidney Disease

Mouse findings reverse prevailing theory; point to potential treatment options

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say that, while a prevailing theory suggests elevated cellular levels of glucose ultimately result in diabetic kidney disease, the truth may, in fact, be quite the opposite. The findings could fundamentally change understanding of how diabetes-related diseases develop – and how they might be better treated. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center


Kumar Sharma, MD, FAHA Kumar Sharma, MD, FAHA, senior author of the study report, is professor of medicine and director of the Center for Renal Translational Medicine in the Division of Nephrology-Hypertension.

Dr. Laura DuganFirst author Laura L. Dugan, MD, at right, is professor of neurosciences and professor and chief of the Division of Geriatrics in the Department of Medicine. She holds the Larry L. Hillblom Chair in Geriatric Medicine.

Second author Young-Hyun You is an associate project scientist in the Division of Nephrology-Hypertension,

Other DOM faculty coauthors are Sameh S. Ali, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Geriatrics, and Robert K. Naviaux, MD, PhD, professor of medicine in the Division of Medical Genetics.

Citation for the study report:

Laura L. Dugan, Young-Hyun You, Sameh S. Ali, Maggie Diamond-Stanic, Satoshi Miyamoto, Anne-Emilie DeCleves, Aleksander Andreyev, Tammy Quach, San Ly, Grigory Shekhtman, William Nguyen, Andre Chepetan, Thuy P. Le, Lin Wang, Ming Xu, Kacie P. Paik, Agnes Fogo, Benoit Viollet, Anne Murphy, Frank Brosius, Robert K. Naviaux and Kumar Sharma. AMPK dysregulation promotes diabetes-related reduction of superoxide and mitochondrial function. J Clin Invest. 2013;123(11):4888–4899. doi:10.1172/JCI66218.  |  Full text (UCSD only)

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Dr. David Brenner Speaking at Grand Rounds March 13

David A. Brenner, MD Speaking at Medicine Grand Rounds on March 13 is Dr. David A. Brenner, vice chancellor for health sciences, dean of the UCSD School of Medicine and professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology.

A physician-scientist, Brenner is widely respected for his translational research in liver disease. He will speak at Grand Rounds on new approaches to therapy for fibrosis.

Brenner is a member of numerous honorific societies including the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the American College of Physicians and the Association of American Physicians, of which he is immediate Past President. Last year, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine.

UC San Diego press releases about his recent research:

Read Dr. Brenner’s School of Medicine Biography

About Medicine Grand Rounds

UCSD’s Medicine Grand Rounds is held weekly on Wednesday mornings, 7:30 – 8:30 a.m., in the Liebow Auditorium, second floor, Biomedical Sciences Building on the UCSD School of Medicine Campus. There is a hiatus in summer.

To see this year’s schedule and find video viewing information, visit the Medicine Grand Rounds page on the Department of Medicine website.

Two from UCSD School of Medicine Named Members of the Institute of Medicine

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) today announced the names of 70 new members and 10 foreign associates during its 42nd annual meeting.  Included are two new members from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine: David A. Brenner, MD, vice chancellor for Health Sciences and dean of the UCSD School of Medicine, and Don W. Cleveland, PhD, chair of the UCSD Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, and professor of medicine, neurosciences, and cellular and molecular medicine at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. David BrennerA translational researcher, Dr. David Brenner investigates the molecular pathogenesis of fibrotic liver disease and the genetic basis of  liver disorders. He is a member of the Division of Gastroenterology in the Department of Medicine.  |  Read his academic biography

New Study Upends Thinking About How Liver Disease Develops

In the latest of a series of related papers, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Austria and elsewhere, present a new and more definitive explanation of how fibrotic cells form, multiply and eventually destroy the human liver, resulting in cirrhosis… Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Pictured above is David Brenner, MD, Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences and dean of the UC San Diego School of Medicine, who is senior author of the research report.  First author of the study is Dr. Christoph H. Österreicher of the Biomedical Genomics (BIOGEM) Microarray Facility in the UCSD Department of Medicine, the Laboratory of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction in the UCSD Department of Pharmacology, and the Medical University of Vienna. Other Department of Medicine coauthors are Drs. Melitta Penz-Österreicher (Medical University of Vienna), Roman Šášik, and BIOGEM director Dr. Gary Hardiman.

Read the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.