Disjointed: Cell Differences May Explain Why Rheumatoid Arthritis Varies By Location

Findings point to new approaches in targeted therapies so that what works for arthritic hands may not be the same for ailing hips —

Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Pennsylvania and China, report that not only are there distinct differences in key cellular processes and molecular signatures between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) but, more surprisingly, there are joint-specific differences in RA. The findings help explain, in part, why drugs treating RA vary in effect – why, for example, a treatment that might work in arthritic knees isn’t effective in an arthritic hip – and provide a potential new template for precisely targeting treatment for each and every ailing joint. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Gary Firestein

Dr. Gary S. Firestein

Gary S. Firestein, MD, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology, is co-corresponding author of the study report with Wei Wang, PhD, professor in the departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Medicine at UC San Diego.

Dr. Firestein is Director of the Clinical and Translational Research Institute (CTRI) and Dean and Associate Vice Chancellor of Translational Medicine for UC San Diego.

A Department of Medicine faculty coauthor of the report is David L. Boyle, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology and Co-Director, Translational Research Technology, CTRI.

Read the study report (UC San Diego Only)

Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute Building Opens March 4

Stunning structure will house array of scientists and centers dedicated to speeding basic research into new treatments and therapies —

Rising above Interstate 5 on the east campus of University of California, San Diego, the Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute Building (ACTRI), a five-sided polygon of glass, steel and grooved concrete, officially opens its doors March 4 in a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

“The building is an architectural marvel, but more important is what it represents and the work that will go on inside,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Gary Firestein

Dr. Gary Firestein

The director of the Clinical and Translational Research Institute at UC San Diego is Gary S. Firestein, MD, Professor of Medicine and Dean and Associate Vice Chancellor of Translational Medicine at UC San Diego.

CTRI opened in 2010 as a part of the national Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium through a five-year, $37.2 million grant from the National Center for Advancing Translational Science of the National Institutes of Health. CTRI received a $52 million renewal grant last year.

More about the activities of the CTRI

 

UC San Diego Part of New Effort to Fight Autoimmune Disorders

Major multi-year partnership will focus first on rheumatoid arthritis and lupus

The Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has been named a key site in a national, multi-institution, multi-year $41.6 million program to speed drug discovery, development, diagnostics and therapies for patients with autoimmune disorders, primarily rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and lupus erythematosus, which affect millions of Americans. …Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

Seema Sharma Aceves MD, PhD, Elected to American Society for Clinical Investigation

Dr. Seema S. AcevesUC San Diego pediatric allergy/immunology physician-scientist Seema Sharma Aceves, MD, PhD, has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI).

She was formally inducted into the Society in a ceremony at the ASCI annual meeting in Chicago on April 26.

“It is a true honor to be included in this distinguished group of translational research leaders,” Aceves said.

“Seema represents the best and the brightest among clinical investigators today,” said Gary S. Firestein, MD, who nominated her for the honor.

“Her remarkable progress understanding the causes of an unusual and very debilitating disease in children made a significant impact on their quality of life.”

Firestein is professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology, Dean of Translational Medicine, Associate Vice Chancellor of Translational Medicine and director of the Clinical and Translational Research Institute.

Aceves, a specialist in pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), is associate professor of clinical medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology and associate professor of pediatrics in the Division of Allergy-Immunology-Rheumatology.

In her research, she investigates the mechanisms of tissue remodeling in EoE, exploring the role of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic molecules. Major support for her work comes from a National Institutes of Health R01 research grant and funding from the Department of Defense.  |  Read NIH grant abstract

Her clinical specialty is pediatric allergy (Rady Children’s Specialists of San Diego). She practices at Rady Children’s Hospital – San Diego, where she directs the Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders Clinic.

Aceves received all of her medical training at UC San Diego. After she earned her MD and PhD in the Medical Scientist Training Program, she completed her internship and residency in the Department of Pediatrics and her fellowship training in allergy and immunology in the Department of Medicine.

She is board certified in allergy/immunology and pediatric allergy/immunology.

She was named a Physician of Exceptional Excellence in the 2012-2013 “San Diego’s Top Doctors” survey from the San Diego County Medical Society and San Diego Magazine and listed as one of the nation’s top doctors on the 2012-2013 U.S.News & World Report “Top Doctors” List.