UC San Diego, UC San Francisco Launch New Cancer Cell Mapping Initiative

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco, with support from a diverse team of collaborators, have launched an ambitious new project – dubbed the Cancer Cell Map Initiative or CCMI – to determine how all of the components of a cancer cell interact.

“We’re going to draw the complete wiring diagram of a cancer cell,” said Nevan Krogan, PhD, director of the UC San Francisco division of QB3, a life science research institute and accelerator, an investigator at Gladstone Institutes and co-director of CCMI with Trey Ideker, PhD, chief of medical genetics in the UC San Diego Department of Medicine and founder of the UC San Diego Center for Computational Biology & Bioinformatics. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

 


Trey Ideker, PhD

Trey Ideker, PhD

Trey Ideker, PhD, is professor of bioengineering and professor of medicine in the Division of Medical Genetics. He was recently named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Dr. Ideker’s Laboratory Website

“Wildly Heterogeneous Genes”

New approach subtypes cancers by shared genetic effects; a step toward personalized medicine

Cancer tumors almost never share the exact same genetic mutations, a fact that has confounded scientific efforts to better categorize cancer types and develop more targeted, effective treatments.

In a paper published in the September 15 advanced online edition of Nature Methods, researchers at the University of California, San Diego propose a new approach called network-based stratification (NBS), which identifies cancer subtypes not by the singular mutations of individual patients, but by how those mutations affect shared genetic networks or systems. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Trey Ideker, PhDLead investigator in the study is Trey Ideker, PhD, professor of medicine and bioengineering and chief of the Division of Medical Genetics in the Department of Medicine.

Postdoctoral researcher Hannah K. Carter and hematology/oncology fellow John P. Shen are the other Department of Medicine coauthors.

Citation for the study report:  Matan Hofree, John P Shen, Hannah Carter, Andrew Gross, Trey Ideker. Network-based stratification of tumor mutations. Nature Methods (2013) doi:10.1038/nmeth.2651. |  Full text (UCSD only)

More Information:

How Infectious Disease May Have Shaped Human Origins

Inactivation of two genes may have allowed escape from bacterial pathogens, researchers say

Roughly 100,000 years ago, human evolution reached a mysterious bottleneck: Our ancestors had been reduced to perhaps five to ten thousand individuals living in Africa. In time, “behaviorally modern” humans would emerge from this population, expanding dramatically in both number and range, and replacing all other co-existing evolutionary cousins, such as the Neanderthals. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom