Robert T. “Chip” Schooley, MD, Stepping Down as Division Chief of Infectious Diseases

August 14, 2017

An announcement from Wolfgang H. Dillmann, MD, Helen M. Ranney Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Medicine

Robert T.

Robert T. “Chip” Schooley, MD

It is with mixed emotions that the Department of Medicine announces that Dr. Robert “Chip” Schooley has stepped down as Division Chief of Infectious Diseases effective August 1, 2017. Dr. Schooley has accepted the position of UCSD Senior Director of International Initiatives, and he will remain as Vice Chair of Academic Affairs in the Department of Medicine, and will continue to be a valuable member of the Infectious Diseases Team.

Dr. Schooley joined the Department in 2005 as the third chief of Infectious Diseases since its inception. Over the past 12 years, under his leadership, the division has nearly doubled in size from having 25 faculty members to 44, with many of them joining the division from the fellowship. During that time, Dr. Schooley has mentored countless medical students, residents, and fellows, and has also helped to develop a collaborative culture within the division, creating a worldwide network of researchers and clinicians. He has personally mentored dozens of fellows and junior faculty, helping them to establish independent careers within academia both at UCSD and at other institutions.

Throughout his tenure, the Infectious Diseases Division has remained the #1 research funded division in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Schooley brought the editorship of the Clinical Infectious Disease Journal to UCSD which served to increase the international reputation of the division and also provided faculty members direct access to outstanding research and collaboration opportunities. Along with the Fellowship Director, Dr. Constance Benson, Dr. Schooley established the Mozambique research and training program at UCSD in 2009, which has served to train hundreds of UCSD residents and fellows, and physicians from Mozambique. This collaboration has helped to further reinforce Dr. Schooley as a world-leader in both the research and management of infectious disease.

Dr. Schooley also helped establish the UCSD HCV clinic, and has never shied away from innovative and entrepreneurial methods to patient care. This was most recently exemplified by his coordination of the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii utilizing bacteriophages in a successful experimental treatment. This outcome could not have been possible were it not for the faculty mentorship, the professional relationships, and the constant innovation exemplified by the entire division of Infectious Diseases under the stewardship of Dr. Schooley.

Please join me in congratulating Dr. Robert Schooley on over a decade of outstanding service to our Department as a brilliant leader, clinician, investigator, mentor, and colleague.

New Video Series Chronicles AIDS Epidemic in Tijuana

“HIV/SIDA: The Epidemic in Tijuana” focuses on UC San Diego researchers’ efforts to track and prevent the spread of HIV among the city’s most at-risk populations —

The new documentary “HIV/SIDA: The Epidemic in Tijuana” offers an unflinching look at the challenges facing researchers from the University of California, San Diego as they attempt to identify and treat people who inject drugs, sex workers, transgender women and others who are at high risk for HIV infection in Tijuana. The program, which was shot over two years, premieres Oct. 5 at 8 p.m. on UCSD-TV and can be viewed at www.uctv.tv/hiv-sida. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


The film features the efforts of Dr. Steffanie Strathdee, her Division of Global Public Health colleagues and a multidisciplinary, multinational team of medical professionals to trace and arrest the spread of AIDS in Tijuana.

Dr. Strathdee is Associate Dean of Global Health Sciences, Harold Simon Professor and Chief of the Division of Global Public Health at UC San Diego.

The four-part documentary, based on the book Tomorrow Is a Long Time by Malcolm Linton and Jon Cohen, premiered on UCSD-TV on October 5. It was supported by funding from the Ford Foundation.

Find more about the documentary here: HIV/SIDA: The Epidemic in Tijuana – UCSD-TV – University of California Television.

Forty-One Department of Medicine Physicians Named on San Diego’s 2015 “Top Doctors” List

This year’s San Diego Magazine/San Diego County Medical Society Top Doctors list includes 41 Department of Medicine faculty clinicians. View photo gallery

Researchers Find Key Player in Diabetic Kidney Disease Through Power of Metabolomics

Tapping the potential of metabolomics, an emerging field focused on the chemical processes of metabolism, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new and pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease.

The study, published online July 22 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, also clarifies a central mechanism of action in diabetic kidney disease that is generating considerable excitement among researchers and the biopharmaceutical community. The mechanism, involving the NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase (NOX) proteins, NOX1 and NOX4, is now the subject of a phase II clinical trial for the treatment of diabetic kidney disease. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego News Center


Kumar Sharma, MD, FAHASenior author of the study report is Kumar Sharma, MD, FAHA, professor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology and director of the Center for Renal Translational Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Read the study report in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology  (UC San Diego Only)

Researchers Illuminate Key Role of NOX Proteins in Liver Disease

Study adds credence to new treatment approach now in clinical trials —

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated a direct connection between two signaling proteins and liver fibrosis, a scarring process underlying chronic liver disease, the 12th leading cause of death in the United States.

The finding adds further credence to a current pharmaceutical effort to create new treatments for diabetic nephropathy, liver fibrosis and other progressive fibrotic and inflammatory diseases, based on blocking these two molecules, both members of the NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase (NOX) family of proteins. … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego News Center


David A. Brenner, MDSenior author of the study report is David A. Brenner, MD, vice chancellor for health sciences, dean of UC San Diego School of Medicine and professor in the Division of Gastroenterology. The report was published online in PLOS ONE on July 29.

Read the article (open access)

New Drug Combination Treats Hepatitis C Patients Also Infected with HIV

Novel treatment has 97 percent success rate in co-infected patients —

Roughly 20 to 30 percent of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). Both blood-borne viruses share the same modes of transmission, but many HCV medications currently have significant limitations due to adverse interactions with HIV treatments. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report a new combination that effectively treats HCV in patients co-infected with HIV. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center


David L. Wyles, MD, is lead author of the New England Journal of Medicine article that reports the results of the multi-center study. Dr. Wyles is associate professor of clinical medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases.

Read the article online:

Wyles D.L., Ruane P.J., Sulkowski M.S., et al. Daclatasvir plus Sofosbuvir for HCV in Patients Coinfected with HIV-1. New England Journal of Medicine July 21, 2015, 10.1056/NEJMoa1503153.  Free full text

Nanospheres Safely Deliver High Chemotherapy Doses in Response to Tumor Secretions

Scientists have designed nanoparticles that release drugs in the presence of a class of proteins that enable cancers to metastasize. That is, they have engineered a drug delivery system so that the very enzymes that make cancers dangerous could instead guide their destruction.

“We can start with a small molecule and build that into a nanoscale carrier that can seek out a tumor and deliver a payload of drug,” said Cassandra Callmann, a graduate student in chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego, and first author of the report published in the journal Advanced Materials July 14. …Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center

UC San Diego and GSK Collaborate to Eradicate Cancer Stem Cells, Treat Leukemia

First California institution selected to participate in GSK’s bench-to-bedside academia-industry collaboration program —

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center are working with GSK on a bench-to-bedside project to treat leukemia and other diseases by eliminating cancer stem cells. The collaboration is part of GSK’s Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) program, where academic partners become core members of drug-hunting teams. Catriona Jamieson, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Regenerative Medicine, will lead UC San Diego’s effort in the new DPAc team. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

Leading Metabolics Researcher Joins UC San Diego School of Medicine

Alan Saltiel will head unified effort to create comprehensive diabetes center —

Alan R. Saltiel, PhD, whose studies of the hormone insulin have helped drive research of obesity, diabetes and other metabolic disorders across the nation, is joining University of California, San Diego School of Medicine as professor and director of a new Comprehensive Diabetes Center.

Saltiel, who most recently served as director of the Life Sciences Institute at University of Michigan, will bring together and expand UC San Diego’s diverse programs to better understand and treat diabetes and other metabolic disorders. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Saltiel joins the Department of Medicine as professor in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Protein’s Impact on Colorectal Cancer is Dappled

In early stages, it acts as tumor suppressor; later it can help spread disease —

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a cell signaling pathway that appears to exert some control over initiation and progression of colorectal cancer, the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. A key protein in the pathway also appears to be predictive of cancer survival rates. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Pradipta GhoshThe study’s senior author is Pradipta Ghosh, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology.