Two Studies Identify Potential New Drug for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

Vedolizumab, a new intravenous antibody medication, has shown positive results for treating both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego, School of Medicine. The findings, published in two papers, will appear in the August 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

UC San Diego Health System Video:
 

William Sandborn, MD,William J. Sandborn, MD professor of clinical medicine and chief of the Division of Gastroenterology, was lead investigator in the Crohn’s disease study and co-investigator in the ulcerative colitis study. He is director of UC San Diego Health System’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center.

Sandborn joined the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine faculty from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in January 2011. There, he was Dorothy A. Adair Professor of Medicine, vice chair of the Mayo Clinic Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and associate dean of research for Intellectual Property and Industry Relations.

Citations for the study reports:

Sandborn WJ, Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, Hanauer S, Colombel J-F, Sands BE, Lukas M, Fedorak RN, Lee S, Bressler B, Fox I, Rosario M, Sankoh S, Xu J, Stephens K, Milch C and Parikh A for the GEMINI 2 Study Group. Vedolizumab as Induction and Maintenance Therapy for Crohn’s Disease. N Engl J Med 2013; 369:711-721 August 22, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1215739. |  Full text (UCSD only)

Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, Sands BE, Hanauer S, Colombel J-F, Sandborn WJ, Van Assche G,  Axler J, Kim H-J, Danese S, Fox I, Milch C, Sankoh S, Wyant T, Xu J and Parikh A for the GEMINI 1 Study Group. Vedolizumab as Induction and Maintenance Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis. N Engl J Med 2013; 369:699-710 August 22, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1215734. |  Full text (UCSD only)

More Information:

Immune Mechanism Blocks Inflammation Generated by Oxidative Stress

Potential therapeutic target for treating disorders like age-related macular degeneration

Conditions like atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) – the most common cause of blindness among the elderly in western societies – are strongly linked to increased oxidative stress, the process in which proteins, lipids and DNA damaged by oxygen free radicals and related cellular waste accumulate, prompting an inflammatory response from the body’s innate immune system that results in chronic disease.

In the October 6, 2011 issue of Nature, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, as part of an international collaborative effort, identify a key protein… Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Senior investigator Christoph J. Binder, MD, PhD, and coworkers report the results in the October 6, 2011, issue of Nature. Read the full text of the report

Dr. Binder is assistant professor of medicine at UC San Diego, principal investigator at the Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and professor at the Medical University of Vienna.His Department of Medicine co-investigators are Joseph L. Witztum, MD, professor of medicine, and Karsten Hartvigsen, PhD, in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism and Sotirios Tsimikas, MD, professor of medicine and director of Vascular Medicine in the Division of Cardiology.

Macrophage Protein Has Major Role in Inflammation

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that a multi-tasking protein called FoxO1 has another important but previously unknown function: It directly interacts with macrophages, promoting an inflammatory response that can lead to insulin resistance and diabetes. Contrarily, it also generates a negative feedback loop that can limit damage from excessive inflammation… Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Dr. Jerrold Olefsky

The researchers are Jerrold M. Olefsky, M.D., and coworkers.  Dr. Olefsky is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism and Associate Dean for Scientific Affairs, UC San Diego Health Sciences.

Read the published study (full text).