Researchers Find Link Between Inflammation, Tissue Regeneration and Wound Repair Response

Discovery has implications for potential new treatments of some cancers and inflammatory bowel disease —

Almost all injuries, even minor skin scratches, trigger an inflammatory response, which provides protection against invading microbes but also turns on regenerative signals needed for healing and injury repair – a process that is generally understood but remains mysterious in its particulars.

Writing in the February 25 online issue of Nature, an international team of scientists, headed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, report finding new links between inflammation and regeneration: signaling pathways that are activated by a receptor protein called gp130.. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. William SandbornStudy coinvestigators included Division of Gastroenterology division chief William Sandborn, MD, and Inflammatory Disease Center researchers Brigid S. Boland and John T. Chang.

Other Department of Medicine coauthors included Petrus R. de Jong; and Samuel B. Ho, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and Section Chief, Gastroenterology, at the VA San Diego Healthcare System.

Full text of the article (UC San Diego only)

UC San Diego Researcher Receives $6.25 Million Grant

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society has awarded Thomas J. Kipps, MD, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with a 5-year, $6.25 million Specialized Center of Research program grant to support research on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common adult leukemia in the United States. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center


Dr. Thomas Kipps

Dr. Thomas Kipps

Thomas J. Kipps, MD, PhD, is the Evelyn and Edwin Tasch Chair in Cancer Research and UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center deputy director for research.

See other UC San Diego news stories about Dr. Kipps and his work.

Researchers Identify Liver Cancer Progenitor Cells Before Tumors Become Visible

For the first time, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have isolated and characterized the progenitor cells that eventually give rise to malignant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors – the most common form of liver cancer. The researchers found ways to identify and isolate the HCC progenitor cells (HcPC) long before actual tumors were apparent. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center

How the Immune System Fights Back Against Anthrax Infections

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences have uncovered how the body’s immune system launches its survival response to the notorious and deadly bacterium anthrax. The findings, reported online today and published in the June 22 issue of the journal Immunity, describe key emergency signals the body sends out when challenged by a life-threatening infection…. Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Dr. Lars Eckmann

Dr. Lars Eckmann is one of the study coauthors. Lars Eckmann, MD, is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology.  |  Read the report online in Immunity (free full text of article in press).

Promising New Target for Stifling the Growth and Spread of Cancer

UCSD researchers find inhibiting single protein blocks the inflammation that fuels tumors

Cancer and chronic inflammation are partners in peril, with the latter increasing the likelihood that malignant tumors will develop, grow and spread. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say they’ve identified a tumor inflammation trigger that is common to most, if not all, cancers … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Dr. Judith A. Varner

The study’s senior investigator is Judith A. Varner, PhD, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology-Oncology and researcher in the Tumor Growth, Invasion and Metastasis Program at UCSD Moores Cancer Center. Collaborators include Department of Medicine faculty members Seth J. Field, MD, PhD, and Mark H. Ginsberg, MD.  |  Read the published study in the June 14, 2011, issue of Cancer Cell (free full text).