New More Effective Antimicrobials Might Rise From Old

Findings could have major impact in struggle against evolving drug resistance

By tinkering with their chemical structures, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have essentially re-invented a class of popular antimicrobial drugs, restoring and in some cases, expanding or improving, their effectiveness against drug-resistant pathogens in animal models.

Writing in the October 7 Early Edition of PNAS, Lars Eckmann, MD, professor of medicine, and colleagues … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. Lars EckmannLars Eckmann, MD, professor of medicine and a researcher in the Division of Gastroenterology, is senior investigator in the study.

Eckmann directs the UCSD Center for Tissue Repair, Epithelial Biology and Inflammation, and Transformation (C-TREAT), a National Institutes of Health Digestive Disease Research Development Center.

In his research laboratory, he addresses the mechanisms governing infection-related intestinal disease and the host defenses against them; and the pathophysiology of intestinal inflammation.

Other Department of Medicine coauthors of the PNAS report are project scientist Yukiko Miyamoto, Dae Young Cheung, Ricardo Lozano, Eduardo R. Cobo and professor Douglas E. Berg.

Citation for the study report:

Yukiko Miyamoto, Jarosław Kalisiak, Keith Korthals, Tineke Lauwaet, Dae Young Cheung, Ricardo Lozano, Eduardo R. Cobo, Peter Upcroft, Jacqueline A. Upcroft, Douglas E. Berg, Frances D. Gillin, Valery V. Fokin, K. Barry Sharpless, and Lars Eckmann. Expanded therapeutic potential in activity space of next-generation 5-nitroimidazole antimicrobials with broad structural diversity. PNAS 2013; published ahead of print October 7, 2013, doi:10.1073/pnas.1302664110  |  Full text PDF (UCSD only)

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Two Studies Identify Potential New Drug for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

Vedolizumab, a new intravenous antibody medication, has shown positive results for treating both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego, School of Medicine. The findings, published in two papers, will appear in the August 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

UC San Diego Health System Video:
 

William Sandborn, MD,William J. Sandborn, MD professor of clinical medicine and chief of the Division of Gastroenterology, was lead investigator in the Crohn’s disease study and co-investigator in the ulcerative colitis study. He is director of UC San Diego Health System’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center.

Sandborn joined the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine faculty from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in January 2011. There, he was Dorothy A. Adair Professor of Medicine, vice chair of the Mayo Clinic Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and associate dean of research for Intellectual Property and Industry Relations.

Citations for the study reports:

Sandborn WJ, Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, Hanauer S, Colombel J-F, Sands BE, Lukas M, Fedorak RN, Lee S, Bressler B, Fox I, Rosario M, Sankoh S, Xu J, Stephens K, Milch C and Parikh A for the GEMINI 2 Study Group. Vedolizumab as Induction and Maintenance Therapy for Crohn’s Disease. N Engl J Med 2013; 369:711-721 August 22, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1215739. |  Full text (UCSD only)

Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, Sands BE, Hanauer S, Colombel J-F, Sandborn WJ, Van Assche G,  Axler J, Kim H-J, Danese S, Fox I, Milch C, Sankoh S, Wyant T, Xu J and Parikh A for the GEMINI 1 Study Group. Vedolizumab as Induction and Maintenance Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis. N Engl J Med 2013; 369:699-710 August 22, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1215734. |  Full text (UCSD only)

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Study Finds Potential New Drug Therapy for Crohn’s Disease

Ustekinumab Induces, Sustains Clinical Response in Patients

Ustekinumab, an antibody proven to treat the skin condition psoriasis, has now shown positive results in decreasing the debilitating effects of Crohn’s Disease, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego, School of Medicine. The study will appear in the October 18, 2012 issue of the New England Journal of MedicineRead the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. William J. SandbornThe principal investigator of the study is Dr. William J. Sandborn, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Gastroenterology at UCSD.  |  Read his academic profile  |  Read his clinical profile

Read the report of the study in the New England Journal of Medicine (full text UCSD only)

Citation of study report:  Sandborn WJ, Gasink C, Gao L-L, Blank MA, Johanns J, Guzzo C, Sands BE, Hanauer SB, Targan S, Rutgeerts P,  Ghosh S, de Villiers WJS, Panaccione R, Greenberg G, Schreiber S, Lichtiger S, Feagan BG for the CERTIFI Study Group. N Engl J Med 2012; 367:1519-1528 October 18, 2012 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203572

UC San Diego Sulpizio Family Cardiovascular Center Honored for Design Excellence

The Sulpizio Family Cardiovascular Center, UC San Diego Health System

Sulpizio Family Cardiovascular Center, UC San Diego Health System

The region’s only comprehensive cardiovascular facility receives 2012 Modern Healthcare Award

UC San Diego Sulpizio Family Cardiovascular Center has received Modern Healthcare’s highest design honor, the 2012 Modern Healthcare Design Award. Out of more than one hundred entries, only one other project received this honor in 2012. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

New Drug Target Improves Memory in Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the Medical University of South Carolina, the University of Cincinnati, and American Life Science Pharmaceuticals of San Diego have validated the protease cathepsin B (CatB) as a target for improving memory deficits and reducing the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Read the abstract of the study report in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease

Dr. Vivian Hook
Study co-investigator Vivian Y. H. Hook, PhD, is professor in the departments of neurosciences and pharmacology and professor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology-Hypertension.

Related story: Potential New Drug Candidate Found for Alzheimer’s Disease, May 31, 2011

Roche Funds Drug Discovery Projects at UC San Diego

The new UC San Diego-Roche Extending Innovation Network (EIN) program has been launched with selection of its first three research projects at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. The UC San Diego-Roche EIN program, which was formalized in June 2011, aims to accelerate the discovery of new drug therapies through research innovation at the interface of industry and academia. The program is slated to grow in the coming years as additional rounds of proposals are solicited. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

M. Geoffrey Rosenfeld, MD
M. Geoffrey Rosenfeld, MD (pictured above), is a co-investigator with Xiang-Dong Fu, PhD, on one of the three UC San Diego-Roche EIN-funded projects, in which the investigators will use genomic and RNA-based approaches to identify new drug targets.

Dr. Rosenfeld is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism and a professor of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Fu is Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and a member of the Institute for Genomic Medicine.

DNA Mismatch Repair Happens Only During A Brief Window of Opportunity

In eukaryotes – the group of organisms that include humans – a key to survival is the ability of certain proteins to quickly and accurately repair genetic errors that occur when DNA is replicated to make new cells.

In a paper published in the December 23, 2011 issue of the journal Science, researchers at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have solved part of the mystery of how these proteins do their job… Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

The new findings come from the Laboratory of Cancer Genetics in the San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, the departments of Medicine and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, the Moores Cancer Center, and the Institute for Genomic Medicine in the UCSD School of Medicine.

Senior investigator Richard D. Kolodner, PhD, head of the Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, is a professor in the departments of Medicine and Cellular and Molecular Medicine. First author Christopher D. Putnam, PhD, is assistant professor of medicine and coauthors Hans Hombauer and Anjana Srivatsan are postdoctoral fellows in the Kolodner laboratory.

Read the study report in Science

UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center Opens to Public

UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center (SCVC) will officially open its doors to the public on Monday, August 8 after the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) certified the SCVC for patient care. The region’s first cardiovascular center is now accessible to the tens of thousands of Californians who are at risk for or suffer from heart disease and stroke. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

   

Dr. Kirk L. Peterson directs the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center. Kirk L. Peterson, MD, FACP, FACC, is Edith and William M. Perlman Professor of Clinical Cardiology in the Division of Cardiology.

UCSD Health Sciences Partners with Pfizer to Speed Drug Delivery

Research agreement could represent more than $50 million over five years for development of new therapies to benefit major medical needs

In an innovative collaboration designed to speed the process of drug discovery, Pfizer, Inc. and the University of California, San Diego Health Sciences announced today that UC San Diego has joined the ranks of other top-tier life science research institutions across the country as part of Pfizer’s Centers for Therapeutic Innovation (CTI)…. Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom