Dr. Victoria Ojeda Receives UCGHI Junior Faculty Fellowship Award

Dr. Victoria OjedaVictoria Ojeda, MPH, PhD, public health researcher and assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Global Public Health, has received a Junior Faculty Fellowship Program award for 2013-2014 from the University of California Global Health Institute (UCGHI).

The UCGHI Junior Faculty Fellowship Program, funded by a private donor, supports global health investigators in focused, multidisciplinary projects to develop their skills in investigation, training and leadership.

The award will support Ojeda’s ongoing work with deportees in Tijuana, Baja California, funding her project, “Tijuana Business Attitudes Toward Deportees and the Acceptability of an Employment Opportunities Program.”

Ojeda’s related Tijuana study, “Social incorporation following deportation and implications for health status and access to care,” is supported by a UCGHI GloCal Health Fellowship award she received in 2012. The GloCal Fellowship, a one-year mentored research fellowship, is a program of the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center and a UCGHI consortium.

Ojeda focuses her research on substance use, HIV/AIDS infection, and mental health co-morbidities in migrant populations, including injection drug users and female sex workers. Through a number of studies in Tijuana and elsewhere, she is examining how patterns of population movement, including migration and deportation, affect the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other blood-borne infections in the United States-Mexico border region.

Ojeda earned her MPH and PhD in Community Health Sciences at the School of Public Health at UCLA and completed a NIMH Post-doctoral fellowship in Mental Health Policy at the Department of Health Care Policy at the Harvard Medical School.

She is principal investigator of a five-year, NIDA-funded K01 career development project Mexican Female Migration, Substance Use, Sex work, and HIV Risks in Tijuana (Mujer Migrante). She is a research associate of the UCSD Center for Comparative Immigration Studies and a faculty member in the UCSD-SDSU Joint Doctoral Program in Global Public Health.

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DELPHI Project Foretells Future of Personalized Population Health

NSF awards $2 million over four years to UC San Diego computer scientists and physicians

Imagine a new type of healthcare app that does it all – it helps you understand your current health status, assists you in making changes in your life to improve your health, and takes into account the perspective of your entire life history, others in your age group–and perhaps even your neighborhood– who share similar characteristics.

That’s the vision put forward by a team of physicians and computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego who are collaborating on a new digital resource that would take advantage of advances in databases, cyberinfrastructure and machine learning to usher in a new era of health and health care…. Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. Lucila Ohno-MachadoLucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, FACMI, is an investigator on the project, whose title is “Data E-platform Leveraged for Patient Empowerment and Population Health Improvement (DELPHI).”

Dr. Ohno-Machado is professor of medicine and founding chief of the Division of Biomedical Informatics. She directs, among other projects, another UCSD biomedical cyberinfrastructure, the Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymizing and Sharing (iDASH) project. IDASH is a National Center for Biomedical Computing under the auspices of the NIH Roadmap for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. Under AHRQ funding, she directs the related project Scalable National Network for Effectiveness Research (SCANNER).

Dr. Ohno-Machado’s research specialty is predictive modeling with an emphasis on calibration methods that combine phenotype and genotype/gene expression data for personalized medicine.

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