SDSC/UCSD Study Uncovers Mechanisms of Cancer-Causing Mutations

Computer modeling leads to more precise targeting of therapies —

Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego, have described for the first time the molecular mechanism of cancer development caused by well-known “resistance” mutations in the gene called epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

While these mutations were known for quite a long time, the question as to why they cause cancer or make some drugs ineffective was still not answered.

The study, called “Molecular Determinants of Drug-Specific Sensitivity for Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Exon 19 and 20 Mutants in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer,” and published online in the journal Oncotarget, demonstrates how computer modeling of EGFR mutations found in lung cancer can elucidate their molecular mechanism of action and consequently optimize the selection of therapeutic agents to treat patients. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Razelle Kurzrock

Dr. Razelle Kurzrock

The senior investigator in the study was Razelle Kurzrock, MD. Dr. Kurzrock is Chief of the Division of Hematology & Oncology; Murray Professor of Medicine; Senior Deputy Director, Clinical Science and
Director, Center for Personalized Cancer Therapy and Clinical Trials Office at the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center.

Lyudmila A. Bazhenova, MD, associate professor of medicine and leader of the Lung Cancer Unit Team at the Moores Cancer Center, was also an investigator in the study.

Read the study report (UC San Diego only)

UC San Diego, UC San Francisco Launch New Cancer Cell Mapping Initiative

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco, with support from a diverse team of collaborators, have launched an ambitious new project – dubbed the Cancer Cell Map Initiative or CCMI – to determine how all of the components of a cancer cell interact.

“We’re going to draw the complete wiring diagram of a cancer cell,” said Nevan Krogan, PhD, director of the UC San Francisco division of QB3, a life science research institute and accelerator, an investigator at Gladstone Institutes and co-director of CCMI with Trey Ideker, PhD, chief of medical genetics in the UC San Diego Department of Medicine and founder of the UC San Diego Center for Computational Biology & Bioinformatics. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego Newsroom

 


Trey Ideker, PhD

Trey Ideker, PhD

Trey Ideker, PhD, is professor of bioengineering and professor of medicine in the Division of Medical Genetics. He was recently named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Dr. Ideker’s Laboratory Website

DELPHI Project Foretells Future of Personalized Population Health

NSF awards $2 million over four years to UC San Diego computer scientists and physicians

Imagine a new type of healthcare app that does it all – it helps you understand your current health status, assists you in making changes in your life to improve your health, and takes into account the perspective of your entire life history, others in your age group–and perhaps even your neighborhood– who share similar characteristics.

That’s the vision put forward by a team of physicians and computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego who are collaborating on a new digital resource that would take advantage of advances in databases, cyberinfrastructure and machine learning to usher in a new era of health and health care…. Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. Lucila Ohno-MachadoLucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, FACMI, is an investigator on the project, whose title is “Data E-platform Leveraged for Patient Empowerment and Population Health Improvement (DELPHI).”

Dr. Ohno-Machado is professor of medicine and founding chief of the Division of Biomedical Informatics. She directs, among other projects, another UCSD biomedical cyberinfrastructure, the Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymizing and Sharing (iDASH) project. IDASH is a National Center for Biomedical Computing under the auspices of the NIH Roadmap for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. Under AHRQ funding, she directs the related project Scalable National Network for Effectiveness Research (SCANNER).

Dr. Ohno-Machado’s research specialty is predictive modeling with an emphasis on calibration methods that combine phenotype and genotype/gene expression data for personalized medicine.

More Information:

SDSC’s “Big Data” Expertise Aiding Genomics Research

Focus on Genomics Medicine is Growing, says SDSC’s Norman

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, has in the last three years undergone a major reboot, remaking itself into a center of expertise on all aspects of “big data” research including genomics, one of the fastest growing areas of scientific study. …. Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom

Dr. Lucila Ohno-Machado
Among the current “big data” genomics projects at the San Diego Supercomputer Center is the Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymization, and Sharing (iDASH) center, led by Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, pictured above.

Ohno-Machado is professor of medicine, founding chief of the Division of Biomedical Informatics and associate dean for informatics and technology at UC San Diego.

iDASH is supported by the National Institutes of Health through the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research.  |  Read iDASH project abstract  |  Visit iDASH website  |   Visit San Diego Supercomputer Center website
Photo of Dr. Ohno-Machado: John Hanacek, Calit2 UC San Diego.