Protein That Protects During Stress Sheds Light on How Diabetes Drug Prevents Tumors

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have identified a previously unknown mechanism that helps fortify the structure and tight junctions between epithelial cells — a basic cell type that lines various body cavities and organs throughout the body, forming a protective barrier against toxins, pathogens and inflammatory triggers. Breaches of this barrier can provoke organ dysfunction and development of tumors.

The findings, published online in the current issue of eLife by senior author Pradipta Ghosh, MD … Read the Full Story from the UC San Diego Newsroom


Dr. Pradipta Ghosh

Pradipta Ghosh, MD

Pradipta Ghosh, MD, MBBS, is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology.

She is a graduate of the UC San Diego Internal Medicine Residency Training Program, the Gastroenterology Fellowship Training Program and the Department of Medicine Physician-Scientist Training Program.

Tumor Suppressor Mutations Alone Don’t Explain Deadly Cancer

Biomarker for head and neck cancers identified

Although mutations in a gene dubbed “the guardian of the genome” are widely recognized as being associated with more aggressive forms of cancer, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found evidence suggesting that the deleterious health effects of the mutated gene may in large part be due to other genetic abnormalities, at least in squamous cell head and neck cancers. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Trey Ideker, PhD

Trey Ideker, PhD, professor and chief in the Division of Medical Genetics and professor of bioengineering, is one of the study’s co-senior authors.

Other Department of Medicine faculty authors include Hannah Carter, PhD, assistant professor; and Scott M. Lippman, MD, professor of medicine and director of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center.

Hannah Carter, PhD Dr. Scott M. Lippman

Cholesterol Sets Off Chaotic Blood Vessel Growth

A study at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine identified a protein that is responsible for regulating blood vessel growth by mediating the efficient removal of cholesterol from the cells. Unregulated development of blood vessels can feed the growth of tumors.  … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. Yury MillerYury Miller, MD, PhD, left, is senior author of the study report. He is associate professor of medicine in the Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism and faculty member in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program.

He first joined UC San Diego as a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Joseph Witztum’s laboratory in 1998.

Miller is principal investigator of a National Institutes of Health R01 research grant, “Zebrafish Models of Vascular Inflammation and Atherosclerosis,” and a subproject of a P01 research program project with the La Jolla Institute of Allergy & Immunology, “Oxidized lipids and endotoxemia in vascular inflammation.”

Longhou Fang, PhDFirst author Longhou Fang, PhD, left, is a postdoctoral fellow in the Miller laboratory. He is the recipient of a National Institutes of Health K99 postdoctoral award for the project, “AIBP-mediated cholesterol efflux and angiogenesis.”

The other coauthors excepting Drs. Ulrich and Torres-Vásquez are affiliated with the Department of Medicine.

Dr. Philipp Wiesner.

Second-year internal medicine resident Philipp Wiesner, MD, right, who chose Miller as one of his mentors for the investigations he performed during his residency program research rotation, presented data from the vascular inflammation project at Medicine Grand Rounds on May 15.

Wiesner is also a coauthor of the study reported in Nature.

Citation for the study report:  Longhou Fang, Soo-Ho Choi, Ji Sun Baek, Chao Liu, Felicidad Almazan, Florian Ulrich, Philipp Wiesner, Adam Taleb, Elena Deer, Jennifer Pattison, Jesús Torres-Vázquez, Andrew C. Li & Yury I. Miller. Control of angiogenesis by AIBP-mediated cholesterol efflux. Nature (2013) doi:10.1038/nature12166. Published online 29 May 2013.  |  Read the full text (UCSD only)

More Information

Other UC San Diego news stories about Miller’s work:

Philipp Wiesner’s May 15 Medicine Grand Rounds presentation “Oxidized Phospholipids in Inflammation and Atherosclerosis”  |  Watch video (UCSD only)