Non-Invasive Test Optimizes Colon Cancer Screening Rates

Underserved populations need options for colorectal cancer screening if screening rates are to be improved, study finds

Organized mailing campaigns could substantially increase colorectal cancer screening among uninsured patients, a study published in the August 5 online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine reveals. The research also suggests that a non-invasive colorectal screening approach, such as a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) might be more effective in promoting participation in potentially life-saving colon cancer screening among underserved populations than a colonoscopy, a more expensive and invasive procedure. … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. Samir GuptaLead investigator in the study was Samir Gupta, MD, MSCS, associate professor of clinical medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology.

Gupta specializes in screening for and preventing colorectal cancer and polyps.

Before he joined the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine faculty in January 2013, Gupta was assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases at the UT Southwestern Medical Center. He was a National Institutes of Health KL2 Clinical Scholar there from 2007 to 2010, earning his Masters of Science in Clinical Science (MSCS) degree.

Gupta sees patients at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and UC San Diego Health System.

Citation for the study report: Gupta S, Halm EA, Rockey DC, et al. Comparative Effectiveness of Fecal Immunochemical Test Outreach, Colonoscopy Outreach, and Usual Care for Boosting Colorectal Cancer Screening Among the Underserved: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Intern Med. 2013;():-. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.9294. |  Full text (UCSD only)

More Information:

  • Gupta’s academic profile
  • Gupta’s clinical profile
  • JAMA Network Author Video: Samir Gupta, MD, MSCS, discusses Comparative Effectiveness of Fecal Immunochemical Test Outreach, Colonoscopy Outreach, and Usual Care for Boosting Colorectal Cancer Screening Among the Underserved: A Randomized Clinical Trial.  |  Watch video  (UCSD only)
  • Gupta is an organizer and speaker at the UCSD Division of Gastroenterology’s 7th Annual Research Symposium on Malignancies of the Digestive System  |  Details

Global Public Health Division’s Projects Highlighted During Chancellor’s Visit to Tijuana Clinic

University of California, San Diego, Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla’s visit to Tijuana, B.C., on May 3 included a stop at the Health Frontiers in Tijuana (HFiT) Clinic, a free clinic where students and faculty from the UC San Diego Division of Global Public Health team up with their counterparts from the Universidad Autónomo de Baja California (UABC) to provide health care in one of the poorest parts of Tijuana.

Chancellor Pradeep Khosla and Jose Luis Burgos.

Dr. Jose Luis Burgos with Chancellor Khosla outside HFiT Clinic. Photo by Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego Publications

In the photo above, Chancellor Khosla speaks with Jose Luis Burgos, MD, MPH, outside the clinic. An assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Global Public Health, Burgos is a faculty mentor at the clinic and a specialist in global health and development. His current research project: The Role of Economic Evaluation in Translating HIV/AIDS Behavioral Interventions.

At the HFiT Clinic, faculty mentors from both UC San Diego and UABC direct the medical students, fellows and other medical trainees in caring for patients.  The clinic is now a part of MED 239, an elective course for medical students in the UCSD School of Medicine.

The students and faculty working in the clinic also contribute to global public health division projects investigating prevention of HIV and STD, substance abuse, policing practices and sex trafficking.  |  More about current projects

Dr. Steffanie Strathdee at work in the El Cuete program.

Dr. Steffanie Strathdee during a visit to Tijuana for the El Cuete program, a global public health division epidemiology project tracing HIV, tuberculosis and other infections among injection drug users.

During her presentation on the chancellor’s tour, global public health division chief Steffanie Strathdee said, “We align research, training and service. And we, the professors, learn as much from the students as they learn from us.”

Steffanie Strathdee, PhD, is associate dean of global health sciences, Harold Simon Professor and chief of the Division of Global Public Health and director of the Global Health Initiative at UC San Diego.

Strathdee’s current research projects: Impact of Drug Policy Reform on the HIV Risk Environment Among IDUs in Tijuana (El Cuete, Phase IV) and HIV/STI Risks among FSWs and Their Non-Commercial Partners (Proyecto Parejas).

Jay Silverman, PhD

Dr. Jay Silverman. Photo by Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego Publications

At left below, global public health professor Dr. Jay Silverman speaks during a presentation about the division’s work in Tijuana.

Silverman is regarded as the world’s leading public health authority on trafficking of women and girls for sexual exploitation.

He is principal investigator of the first R01 research grant the National Institutes of Health has ever issued on sex trafficking. Funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the four-year project is “Epidemiology of Sex Trafficking, Drug Use and HIV at the U.S.-Mexico Border.”

Drs. Kimberly Brouwer (below) and Victoria Ojeda also presented their projects during the tour.

Dr. Kimberly Brouwer

Dr. Kimberly Brouwer during her presentation in Tijuana. Photo by Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego Publications

Brouwer is an associate professor of medicine in the Division of Global Public Health. Her work focuses on the spatial and molecular epidemiology of infectious diseases.

She is principal investigator of two R01 research grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, one investigating factors that influence HIV transmission in the U.S. – Mexico border region: Evolving HIV/STI Risk Environments of FSWS on the Mexico/U.S. Border.

Victoria Ojeda (below) is an assistant professor in the global health division. Her project, “Social Incorporation Following Deportation and Implications for Health Status and Access to Care,” is based at the HFiT Clinic.

Dr. Victoria Ojeda

Dr. Victoria Ojeda.

Funding for the project comes from Ojeda’s 2012-2013 University of California Global Health Institute (GloCal) Health Fellowship, one of only three such fellowships awarded last year.

Below, Ojeda is pictured at the HFiT Clinic.

Dr. Victoria Ojeda.

Dr. Victoria Ojeda at the HFiT Clinic in Tijuana, where her GloCal Fellowship project is based.

 


Global public health division faculty with Pradeep Khosla, UC San Diego chancellor.

Chancellor Khosla with members of the Division of Global Public Health.

Sources

Chancellor Khosla’s visit to Tijuana was covered in Kristin Luciani’s UCSD News story, “Cross-Border Connections: Chancellor Visits Tijuana to Learn about Industry, Healthcare and Education,” released May 9. The photos for that story and the images of Drs. Burgos, Silverman and Brouwer and the group shown here are by Erik Jepsen of UC San Diego Publications.

For more information about the global public health division’s projects in the U.S. – Mexico border area and elsewhere in the world, visit the Division of Global Public Health academic website.