Enzyme Restores Function with Diabetic Kidney Disease

Mouse findings reverse prevailing theory; point to potential treatment options

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say that, while a prevailing theory suggests elevated cellular levels of glucose ultimately result in diabetic kidney disease, the truth may, in fact, be quite the opposite. The findings could fundamentally change understanding of how diabetes-related diseases develop – and how they might be better treated. … Read the full story from the UC San Diego News Center


Kumar Sharma, MD, FAHA Kumar Sharma, MD, FAHA, senior author of the study report, is professor of medicine and director of the Center for Renal Translational Medicine in the Division of Nephrology-Hypertension.

Dr. Laura DuganFirst author Laura L. Dugan, MD, at right, is professor of neurosciences and professor and chief of the Division of Geriatrics in the Department of Medicine. She holds the Larry L. Hillblom Chair in Geriatric Medicine.

Second author Young-Hyun You is an associate project scientist in the Division of Nephrology-Hypertension,

Other DOM faculty coauthors are Sameh S. Ali, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Geriatrics, and Robert K. Naviaux, MD, PhD, professor of medicine in the Division of Medical Genetics.

Citation for the study report:

Laura L. Dugan, Young-Hyun You, Sameh S. Ali, Maggie Diamond-Stanic, Satoshi Miyamoto, Anne-Emilie DeCleves, Aleksander Andreyev, Tammy Quach, San Ly, Grigory Shekhtman, William Nguyen, Andre Chepetan, Thuy P. Le, Lin Wang, Ming Xu, Kacie P. Paik, Agnes Fogo, Benoit Viollet, Anne Murphy, Frank Brosius, Robert K. Naviaux and Kumar Sharma. AMPK dysregulation promotes diabetes-related reduction of superoxide and mitochondrial function. J Clin Invest. 2013;123(11):4888–4899. doi:10.1172/JCI66218.  |  Full text (UCSD only)

Related UC San Diego news stories:

Regular Chocolate Eaters are Thinner

Katharine Hepburn famously said of her slim physique: “What you see before you is the result of a lifetime of chocolate.” New evidence suggests she may have been right.

Beatrice Golomb, MD, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues present new findings that may overturn the major objection to regular chocolate consumption: that it makes people fat … Read the full story from the UCSD Newsroom


Dr. Golomb is professor of medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine at UCSD and a primary care physician at the Veterans Administration San Diego Healthcare System.

More information:

UC San Diego Researcher Awarded $5.3 Million for Breast Cancer Survivorship Study

Dr. Barbara A. Parker is an investigator in the new clinical trial described in “UC San Diego Researcher Awarded $5.3 Million for Breast Cancer Survivorship Study” from the UCSD Newsroom.

Barbara A. Parker, M.D., Medical Director of Oncology Services for the Moores UCSD Cancer Center, is Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of Hematology-Oncology.